Cofactors


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Cofactors

 

in biochemistry, substances necessary for the catalytic activity of a particular enzyme. Cofactors are essential constituents of most enzyme systems and are classified as fol-lows: prosthetic groups, which are strongly bonded with the protein carrier apoenzyme; coenzymes, which are relatively easy to separate from apoenzymes; and metal ions (metallic coenzymes). No clearly defined boundary exists between the terms “cofactor,” “coenzyme,” and “prosthetic group.”

REFERENCES

“Fermenty.” Edited by A. E. Braunshtein. Moscow, 1964. (Osnovy molekuliarnoi biologii.) Page 148.
Kretovich, V. L. Vvedenie v enzimologiiu. Moscow, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manganese is another nitrate reductase cofactor, and when it is limiting, manganese fertilizer applications by foliar spray or drip application will elicit foliage darkening and growth responses.
In order to prevent toxicity and chronic disease, it is important to ensure that a given individual is consuming sufficient amounts of the required nutrient cofactors (20, 21).
The polynomial K = K(x, y, z) is called the cofactor of f.
Also, as apparent from Figures 3 and 4, in the extant pathways of cofactor biosynthesis, each cofactor requires the involvement of its own cofactors and/or one or more other cofactors.
There is a host of cofactors that cannot be dismissed.
Collectively, our results establish the diet-dependent influence of Pparg2 Pro12Ala variant on metabolic control via modulated cofactor interaction and changes in gene expression patterns in mice," concluded the researchers.
ATLANTA -- Herpes simplex virus-2 does not appear to be a cofactor of human papillomavirus in the development of cervical cancer, Dr.
That individually and environmentally mediated cofactors function in the development of infant methemoglobinemia (iMHG) is not a new finding.
22a), both manganese and magnesium cations are effective cofactors in vitro, but magnesium is the one used in vivo (ref.
Olivamine is a proprietary blend of antioxidants; amino acids and their cofactors, vitamins B6 and B3; and methylsulfonyl-methane.
Crucial steps include identifying infectious etiologies and cofactors, determining persons (including women) at risk for infection or outcome, and implementing measures that minimize chronic sequelae.