Hemileia vastatrix

(redirected from Coffee Leaf Rust)

Hemileia vastatrix

[‚hem·ə‚lē·yə ′vas·tə‚triks]
(mycology)
A fungus of the order Uredinales which is the causative agent of orange coffee rust.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first coffee leaf rust summit to address the outbreak in Central America was held in April in Guatemala City, Guatemala, and aspects of the International Coffee Organization Council Meeting that took place in Brazil last month also focused on the epidemic.
Furthermore, the FNC (Colombian Coffee Federation) is trying to share with coffee farmers in Central America how they dealt with a recent coffee leaf rust outbreak.
Beginning in late 2012, a fungal epidemic of coffee leaf rust known as Roya has affected up to 40 percent of the coffee fields in Honduras and Nicaragua.
Fungus diseases, such as Botrytis Flower Blight, Colletriehum Berry Disease, and the infamous coffee leaf rust take their tolls and are difficult to control with costly fungicides.
The inspections are to prevent the entry of the coffee leaf rust (which is not found on green coffee beans), the coffee berry borer and Mediterranean fruit fly.
The SAFAI Foundation, a philanthropic arm of wholesale and retail coffee roaster Safai Enterprises, has committed to replanting 80 coffee farms in Central and South America that were ravaged by coffee leaf rust.
From the droughts in Brazil this past winter and in Assam, India, this past spring, to the continuing devastation of coffee leaf rust in Central America, there is little doubt that shifts in climate have had an impact on both the production and quality of tea and coffee.
Panama's coffee production has been hurt by coffee berry borer (broca) and coffee leaf rust (roya) in the past decade, and the generation of sterile seeds is seen as a tool to avoid future susceptibility to pests and plagues.
Both Fair Trade USA and Fairtrade International responded to Latin America's coffee leaf rust crisis.