Cohousing

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Cohousing

Development pattern in which multiple (typically 8–30) privately owned houses or housing units are clustered together with some commonly owned spaces, such as a common workshop or greenhouse. Automobiles are typically kept to the perimeter of the community, creating a protected area within the community where children can play. Usually, residents are closely involved in all aspects of the development, from site selection to financing and design.
References in periodicals archive ?
So not all cohousing communities at this time identify as ecovillages and not all ecovillages are made up of cohousing neighborhoods, but there is a trend to merge the two movements and it is this trend that I find most promising.
Cohousing communities in the US have received most of HUD's innovations in home ownership awards over the last 10 years, plus many other accolades, especially for green features.
There are now more than 100 cohousing communities across the United States and roughly the same amount in some stage of planning, yet Marshall's is the only one in New York listed with the Cohousing Association of the United States.
It can take a long time for adults to get used to living in cohousing communities, even extroverts," said Chris Scott Hanson, a cohousing developer and consultant.
Cohousing communities are residential models rooted in a voluntary commitment to group priorities, goals, and concerns, expressed in a variety of ways, from scheduled communal meals to coordinated trips to the grocery store.
Sustainable Community begins with a colorful overview of the history of cohousing and catalogs Meltzer's observations of 12 cohousing communities in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Japan.
The couple, who are also eight-year cohousing residents, have worked together since 1996 to help multi-generational cohousing communities come into being across the nation.
The cohousing communities still entail private home ownership, but with more modest sizes, more sharing of open space and more pooling of resources ranging from lawn mowers to gardens to child care.
The strength of professional partnerships with the future residents and a new streamlined approach to cohousing development pioneered by Leach has allowed a record number of cohousing communities to be built in the U.
About 55 cohousing communities now thrive in the United States and Canada - all built since the late 1980s - with 150 more in various stages of planning.
Cohousing communities are typically composed of 15 to 35 households whose members have worked together for two to three years to plan the neighborhood.
The non-profit organization lists 75 completed cohousing communities on its website (http://www.