cold desert


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cold desert

[¦kōld ′dez·ərt]
(ecology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Kuchar wound up winning, 2 and 1, when Mahan removed the stocking cap he used to fight the cold desert air and conceded Kuchar a short birdie putt.
After grinding into rocks and sifting through dirt, Opportunity made one of the enduring finds on Mars: Signs abound of an ancient environment that was warmer and wetter than today's dusty, cold desert state.
This book may be his swan song: the last of the classic Western naturalists travels to perhaps the last place on earth inhabited but not controlled by humans: the cold desert plains of Tibet.
My shelter had a fireplace for cold desert nights, and I had a battery-operated record player so I could listen to classical music.
The somber reality is, however, that more will be needed, as the camps grow more crowded with vulnerable families and the cold desert winter approaches," he warned.
In the corner was a fireplace to keep it cosy and warm during those cold desert night.
He wore long pants, desert boots, and used a horsehide he found to stretch over his cot to keep the cold from creeping into his bones during the cold desert nights.
As the cold desert night began to climb all over me, I slipped into my camper, slid into my down sleeping bag and drifted off into a dream world that had visions of Coues bucks dancing throughout.
Irrespective of whether it is a hot or a cold desert, the characteristic traits of both almost remain the same.
This experiment illustrates how a cold desert, like Antarctica, can be considered dry.
Each day, he will trek up to 15 miles in blistering heat, before pitching a tent and trying to sleep through the bitterly cold desert night.
Yet, the Rosaceae family is well represented in the cold desert of the Great Basin and in the chaparral vegetation of southern California (Mooney and Dunn 1970).