food irradiation

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food irradiation

[′füd i‚rā·dē¦ā·shən]
(food engineering)
The treatment of fresh or processed foods with ionizing radiation that inactivates biological contaminants (insects, molds, parasites, or bacteria), rendering foods safe to consume and extending their storage lifetime.
References in periodicals archive ?
To extend shelf life of the perishable tea, Jade Monk uses high-pressure-processing, a new method of cold pasteurization that applies high pressure (over 30 tons worth) to inactivate bacteria and other unwanted hazards without the need for high temperature pasteurization which can be detrimental to matcha's delicate flavor and whole food nutrients.
This suggests that atmospheric cold plasma treatment may achieve a cold pasteurization process for liquid foods to extend their shelf-life and improve safety.
This study examined the effect of cold pasteurization by electromagnetic waves (microwave) on liquid egg yolk and reduction of logarithmic amount of present aerobic mesophilic micro-organisms in samples, and compare it with current thermal methods (regular pasteurization).
Company provides cold pasteurization services to the food industry in the only refrigerated facility of its kind and has government approvals from FDA, USDA, FSIS, and APHIS.
The microbial counts of coconut water were expected to be zero after heat and cold pasteurization because of the low initial microbial load of coconut water.
They also charge that the industry is glossing over concerns by shifting to terms such as cold pasteurization and electronic pasteurization and using irradiation to cover up less-than-adequate safety measures at the processing level.
Serious investigations regarding utilization of ionizing radiation for cold pasteurization were initiated in the early 1950s.
Applied to certain foods, the process, called cold pasteurization, avoids changes in color, flavor, texture, and nutrients that might occur with thermal pasteurization.
However, a lack of fundamental knowledge about the biophysical processes occurring within the food itself during the treatment and the mechanisms of microbial inactivation have restricted industrial development to a partial cold pasteurization preservation process.
Near infrared cold pasteurization (ICP) brings no disadvantages in terms of quality of the products.
Irradiation is called a cold pasteurization process, and the food, in most cases, is exposed for only parts of a second without raising the temperature more than one-and-a-half degrees.
Look into a cold pasteurization process being developed by a team of researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia (Department of Food Science, 3195 W.