Cold-Sensitive Plant

Cold-Sensitive Plant

 

any of various plants that may be destroyed by temperatures between 0° and 6°C. The group comprises plants introduced from warm and hot countries, including such cultivated plants as rice, cucumbers, and cotton. The degree of damage from low temperatures depends on the growing conditions, such as humidity and sunlight, and on the species characteristics, age, and physiological state of the plants. Damage to plants from low temperatures is not immediately apparent; it often appears only after higher temperatures return. The destruction of the plants is due to irreversible disruption of the metabolism.

References in periodicals archive ?
Tip: To give a cold-sensitive plant a measure of protection in the garden, cut the tops off plastic milk or soda containers and fill them with water.
1 Delay sowing cold-sensitive plants such as turnips, endive and Swiss chard, until temperatures are more stable.
Delay sowing cold-sensitive plants such as turnips and Swiss chard until temperatures are more stable.
Some try to sneak in; others hitchhike indoors on cold-sensitive plants and firewood.
It is a good idea to inspect cold-sensitive plants for pests several weeks before bringing them in to provide ample time to take care of any problems.
Cold air, just like rain, rolls down a hilly terrain, not remaining long enough to cause marginally cold-sensitive plants to freeze.