Coleridge


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Coleridge

Samuel Taylor. 1772--1834, English Romantic poet and critic, noted for poems such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), Kubla Khan (1816), and Christabel (1816), and for his critical work Biographia Literaria (1817)
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While living at the property, Wordsworth penned one of his most famous poems - Tintern Abbey - while Coleridge wrote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
Coleridge went on to attack what he claimed was hypocrisy on the part of Queensland lawmakers for considering decriminalizing abortion at the same time as a (http://www.
Coleridge speaks of the relation between dreams and poetry in the following words:
Thus, it is safe to say in our context that if Coleridge had had an advanced meditative training (as the great Romanian romantic poet Mihai Eminescu may have had), he might have salvaged the lost information of the poem he claimed to have composed, because with such training he would have possessed more gamma power, which would have meant more brain coherence, more capacity for memory activation and memory storage, more power to process meaning and more power of concentration--as it is, we are left only with the "ruin" of a poem that might have been one of the greatest in English and world literature.
This summer's 80 day cultural festival will continue to tour the routes taken by Coleridge when he explored Wales.
This contestation is unfolded in more detail in Part 2 ("Addiction"), which features an engaging discussion of the seeming defeat of a reflective, cultivated imagination by what Coleridge judged so apprehensively as "the mindless overconsumption of printed works" and the public's seemingly limitless "desire for being further stimulated" (66).
When the British Government turned to the Established Church for assistance in the amelioration of the condition of the enslaved population in the West Indian colonies, two new Sees of Jamaica and Barbados and the Leeward Islands were created in 1824 and two new Bishops were appointed, Coleridge and Christopher Lipscomb.
The first reference to Don Quixote by Coleridge appears in his essay "The Soul and its Organs of Sense," published in Robert Southey's Omniana in 1812.
This is the story of Dean Coleridge and those who relentlessly pursue him.
Individual topics include the "kowtow" controversy, the "dark tide of time" in Coleridge's and William Hodges's India, Coleridge's sequel to Thalalba and Southey's prequel to Christabel, Coleridge and Empson in Japan, immanence and transcendence, Hinduism, Coleridge's and Shopenhauer's esoteric Buddhism compared, the integral significance of the 1816 preface to "Kubla Khan," psychological infinity and geometric structures, and the geopolitics of the Chinese garden.
The central issue for Sotheby's was its assessment of the date of the Coleridge Collar and whether it was Tudor, dating from prior to 1576, or whether it was post-Restoration, dating to the late seventeenth century.
5) The rumors and so-called "reports" of Coleridge's opium-eating from the footnote are far more significant than appear at first blush: they are deliberate, artful, literary reproductions of Coleridge dramatizing his binge opium consumption and subsequent habituation.