Colobus


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Colobus

 

a genus of monkeys of the subfamily Colobinae. The body measures 43–70 cm in length, and the tail 55–90 cm. The body is slender, with silky fur. The nasal septum is comparatively broad, and the nose protrudes. The coloring of the fur varies greatly. The best-known species are the guereza (C. guereza), the black and white colobus monkey (C. polykomos), and the red and black colobus monkey (C. badius). The genus is distributed in Africa, from Senegal to Ethiopia and southward to Angola and Tanzania. The monkeys live in small groups in tall trees and feed on leaves and fruits.

References in periodicals archive ?
Within-group vigilance in red colobus and redtail monkeys.
Sitting under a tallo tree swatting away the mosquitoes and the tsetse flies and squashing ticks between my thumbnails, a red colobus soap opera unfolds in 3-D Technicolor above my head.
For 11 months, Wasserman and his team followed a group of red colobus monkeys in Uganda's Kibale National Park and recorded what the primates ate.
The black colobus is stacking children's wooden blocks on the kitchenette's table.
The snowy white Kikuyu colobus monkey was born Nov.
This is the only northern safari circuit location where the rare and beautiful Colobus Monkey can be found.
Amid this mosaic habitat live more than 133 species of bird and four species of primate: the vulnerable red colobus, fleet-footed patas monkeys, nocturnal galagos--and the green monkeys.
Among primate species most at risk, or "critically endangered", are the Bouvier's red colobus, an African monkey which has not been seen in 25 years, and the greater bamboo lemur of Madagascar, of which there are believed to be only about 140 in the wild.
Among species most at risk, or "critically endangered", were the Bouvier's red colobus, an African monkey which has not been seen in 25 years, and the greater bamboo lemur of Madagascar totalling only about 140 in the wild.
1988) and Johnston (1998), Finlay, James, and Maple (1988) used color slides of zebra, cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), orangutans, lions, Colobus monkeys (Colobus guereza), gorillas, Oryx antelope (Oryx beisa), and chimpanzees in their study because of the availability of such species, similarity to one another (e.
Humans are almost four times likelier to share pathogens with chimpanzees than with colobus monkeys, which branched from the family tree 34.
Among those most at risk are the Miss Waldron's red colobus of Ivory Coast and Ghana, the Goldenheaded langur of Vietnam and China's Hainan gibbon, whose numbers have dwindled to 17.