Columban

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Columban

 

(Latinized, Columbanus). Born c. 540; died 615. Irish monk; preacher of Christianity in Western Europe; one of the representatives of the church culture of formative feudal society.

In about 590, along with a group of monks, Columban left Ireland, which at that time was one of the centers for the spread of Christianity and religious enlightenment in the West, and set off for the Continent. He founded a number of monasteries in Burgundy, Neustria, Austrasia, and the kingdom of Lonibardy.

References in periodicals archive ?
Education Minister John O'Dowd has approved a development proposal to increase the capacity at St Columbanus College, Bangor.
McCormack also had practical experience of racing as the owner of Columbanus, an early big-race winner for Jim Bolger when landing the 1978 Tetrarch Stakes before finishing third in the Irish 2,000 Guineas.
Columbanus converted the Picts, many Irish and Scottish missionaries followed in the footsteps of St.
60) Sermons of Columbanus, Sermon I (Cork, Ireland: University College, 2004), accessed online at: www.
In 1983, he co-founded the inter-church Columbanus Community of Reconciliation in Belfast, where he lived and worked for 10 years.
94) The teachings were promulgated to erstwhile pagans and barbarians by an army of dedicated missionaries like Columbanus, Boniface, and Ulfilas.
Columbanus Church in Chicago, while Deonte Ousley, 26, was taken to a local hospital in critical condition, (http://usnews.
Central to the journey are the stories of four renowned Celtic Saints, including Columbanus and his companion Gallus, founder of a monastic cell on the banks of Lake Constance.
Bobbio in the Early Middle Ages: the abiding legacy of Columbanus.
The accounts of Clemens's alleged dismissal of ecclesiastical authorities shows some resemblance to an episode in the life of his compatriot Columbanus a century and a half earlier.
52) The reason for these cases stems from what Peter Brown, in his study of the rise of Western Christendom, has called the "New Monasticism," brought to an emerging Europe by the celebrated Irish Abbot Columbanus (d.
Here he looks at how monastic Christianity spread from the continent to Celtic Britain from Martin to Patrick, Samson and Gildas, and Columba and Columbanus.