Columella


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Columella

(Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella) (kŏl'yəmĕl`ə), fl. 1st cent. A.D., Latin writer on agriculture, b. Gades (now Cádiz), Spain. Of his work there remains the 12-volume De re rustica, treating general husbandry, the care of domestic animals, and farm management. The 10th book, modeled on Vergil, is in hexameters. A short essay on trees also survives. Columella's Latin is facile and elegant, and his information is surprisingly practical and accurate.

columella

[‚käl·yə′mel·ə]
(anatomy)
(biology)
Any part shaped like a column.
(botany)
A sterile axial body within the capsules of certain mosses, liverworts, and many fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the assessment proposed by Columella is rudimentary, the quality of soil is being evaluated in terms of its friability and structural resilience to tillage and is therefore indicative of its ability to cope with land use change.
However, neither Musonious nor Columella links the advent of imperial rule to the return of domestic life.
More surprisingly, he also studied relatively obscure Roman agricultural works--georgic in content if not always in form--of Cato, Columella, Palladius, and Van-o, citing them frequently in his published works as well as in the Journal (with particular frequency there around the 1854 publication of Walden).
Pena (1990) said the whorls of whelks were first hammered away to reveal the columella.
Among these a pseudoseptal columella (Cyathaxonia and Cyathocarinia), septa-formed columella (Pseudowannerophyllum and Verbeekiella), and septal column (Lophophyllidium (Lophbillidium)) (coral assemblage I, Fig.
He seeks to collect detailed information about what shipbuilders do, and to mould it into a science, much as Columella had done for agriculture, Oliveira was the author of an incomplete translation of Columella, which remained in manuscript and found its way to Paris, where it was published by Portuguese exiles in 1818.
In ancient Rome, ``Virgil and Columella insisted that the farmer taste the soil; distill it through a wine strainer with water and drink the liquor.
Forms of congenital, acquired, or treatment caused facial disfigurements which may be regarded as cultural include "oriental eyelid," non-caucasian nose, double chin, absence of a second cheek dimple, pigmentation problems such as freckles or port wine stain, wrinkles, cheek furrows, flaring of nostrils, other unwanted nasal features such as tips, humps, hanging columella, etc.
At least some shells possessing such a palatal fold were also found to possess a short lamella (tooth) on the columella of the body whorl (Fig.
It contains sweat and oil glands Philtrum Dent above top lip Columella nasi Skin separating the nostrils
Columella seems to have provided Jane Austen with a playful gloss on Wentworth's name as well as an inset tale that might have suggested some of the major elements of the narrative.