Commentator

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Commentator

 

a person who writes or delivers commentaries on a specific subject area (such as political news or sports) for a newspaper or journal or on television or radio. On an editorial staff the position of commentator is usually held by a professional journalist who is a specialist in the given field; the functions of a commentator are also carried out by reviewers. Part-time specialists in a given field (such as agriculture or art) are often drawn upon as commentators.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the pre tournament predictions,majority of the commentators who served the game with dignity and pride rated India and England as the favourites to qualify for the final with the English side most favourite to win the title.
But one thing that comes out clearly here is that commentators today have a boundary to consider, and remarks that cross those lines are laden with risk.
Frequently, there are three commentators on air at the same time.
According to Chappell, it is disgraceful that Indian commentators have been barred from speaking on the contentious issues, especially the Indian Premier League (IPL) spot-fixing story.
Eminem and Masburger, whom the rapper considers a legend in football along with renowned commentators Al Michaels, Pat Summerall and John Madden, talked about all bizarre stuffs such as gambling on national television
Back then, radios were widely available unlike television sets, so commentators like Hisham would be more descriptive about the match at hand.
There are hundreds of analysts, yet none would feel comfortable in the role of commentator - the man responsible for holding things together on air.
Commentator 1--(with some annoyance)--He means the writers.
Many from the current batch of occasionally frenzied commentators should read this and learn.
THOUSANDS of Match Of The Day fans have joined an online campaign to sack Midland-born commentator Jacqui Oatley.
As many commentators have argued, the passion that Americans exhibited for the Kinsey Reports despite the dense statistics and rather terse prose demonstrates the enormous and unmet appetitive for sexual information.