commodity machine

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commodity machine

An off-the-shelf device that is readily available for purchase. Commodity PCs and servers often refer to x86 machines, which are the world's largest desktop, laptop and server platform. See x86-based system, COTS and commodity product.
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The rise of Hadoop, NoSQL, and other distributed computing platforms that rely on commodity hardware has led to a cultural shift away from "big iron" to systems that can scale out by adding lower cost commodity servers.
While firms such as Cisco sell tightly combined networking hardware and software, Cumulus Networks says its Linux-based operating system is a less costly alternative that operates on commodity hardware.
To respond to this dilemma Boston has partnered with Citrix, Mellanox and Supermicro to develop a cost efficient VDI solution based on a commodity hardware architecture that delivers a VDI solution at a price point lower or equivalent to that of a traditional PC.
It runs on commodity hardware or database appliances from EMC Greenplum and Teradata, and supports increasing demands for fast answers from big data, it said.
The topics include fundamental concepts and mechanisms, support of node mobility between networks, low delay communication and multimedia applications, high-performance computing using commodity hardware and software, and the application interface.
Constant Hosting can now offer reliable and scalable cloud storage services via low cost commodity hardware while taking advantage of the broad number of applications in the Amazon Web Services ecosystem, enabling numerous profitable use cases.
Both companies make x86 software that emulates a mainframe environment, allowing mainframe apps to run on commodity hardware.
Kaviza VDI-in-a-Box is a turnkey solution delivered as a virtual appliance that enables organisations to deploy virtual desktops in less than two hours, using commodity hardware.
Aster nCluster Smart Compression reduces costs while increasing flexibility by allowing enterprises to store vast quantities of data for the lowest possible cost on commodity hardware, without sacrificing query performance.
No additional software beyond assignment of I/O to server would be required and thus the open standards and commodity hardware would be fully utilized.
The Linux Enterprise Cluster; build a highly available cluster with commodity hardware and free software.
Good thing, because his challenge is humbling: repairing employee morale, squeezing more profits from a struggling commodity hardware business, fending off rivals like powerhouse Dell, and making hard decisions, such as whether the company should spin off its lucrative printer business.

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