cucullus

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cucullus

[kyü′kəl·əs]
(invertebrate zoology)
A transverse flap at the anterior edge of the carapace that hangs over the mouthparts of certain arachnids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report provides evidence that the races are defined by female lineage, while mating with males maintains the common cuckoo genetically as one species.
1 In this paper, "cuckoo" designates the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), which is the most populous as well as the most commonly studied cuckoo species.
Common Cuckoos are very rare vagrants to North America, so there were a couple of dozen birdwatchers at the site observing the bird's every movement.
Naturalists have long noted a resemblance between Common Cuckoos and Eurasian Sparrowhawks, both in terms of plumage features and flight characteristics.
This mechanism may be similar to female parasites' host-specific egg color matching, documented in Common Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) (Cherry et al.
Identification of the sex responsible for recognition and the method of ejection of parasitic eggs in some potential Common Cuckoo hosts.
Genetic evidence for female host-specific races of the Common Cuckoo.
This may lead to the formation of host specific races, if only females imprint on their hosts as by Common Cuckoos (Gibbs et al.
Cowbird egg mimicry of grassland passerine eggs may eventually resemble the type of mimicry exhibited by the Common Cuckoo.
Most notably different groups of female Common Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) have evolved eggs that closely mimic those of a preferred host (Davies and Brooke 1988, Marchetti et al.
2007) described the 'host-absent vocalization' of the Common Cuckoo as distinct 'si' sounds repeated at intervals of 0.
Host-absent vocalization in the Common Cuckoo has no effect on feeding rate of Reed Warblers.