Common Internet File System


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Common Internet File System

(protocol)
(CIFS) An Internet file system protocol, based on Microsoft's SMB. Microsoft has given CIFS to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as an Internet Draft. CIFS is intended to complement existing protocols such as HTTP, FTP, and NFS.

CIFS runs on top of TCP/IP and uses the Internet's Domain Name Service (DNS). It is optimised to support the slower speed dial-up connections common on the Internet.

CIFS is more flexible than FTP. FTP operations are carried out on entire files whereas CIFS is aimed at routine data access and incorporates high-performance multi-user read and write operations, locking, and file-sharing semantics.

CIFS is probably closest in functionality to NFS. NFS gives random access to files and directories, but is stateless. With CIFS, once a file is open, state about the current access to that file is stored on both the client and the server. This allows changes on the server side to be notified to the clients that are interested.

Microsoft Overview.

SNIA page.

CIFS: A Common Internet File System, Paul Leach and Dan Perry.

IETF Specification. CIFS version 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
NAS appliances process requests for data using stable and mature networking protocols such as Network File Sharing (NFS) and Common Internet File System (CIFS).
The Attune file virtualization natively supports and leverages numerous other Microsoft technologies such as Common Internet File System (CIFS), Server Message Blocks (SMB), Microsoft Cluster Server, Microsoft Active Directory, Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS), Opportunistic Locking (OpLocks), and Microsoft Domain Controller.
Customer candidates with predominantly Common Internet File System (CIFS)- based unstructured file data in heterogeneous environments will have priority for this offer.
This led the OCC team to identify a secure solution that could accelerate the OCC WAN as well as provide a solution for Common Internet File System (CIFS) acceleration to support their file server consolidation project.
WD NetCenter network storage systems feature: - WD Caviar(R) SE 7,200 RPM hard drive inside for fast, quiet and cool operation without a fan - 10/100Base-T Ethernet connection - Common Internet File System (CIFS) for platform-independent file sharing - Two hot-swappable USB host ports - WD EasyLink utility to set up WD NetCenter as a local drive on any computer on the network - WD NetCenter Manager software to easily view system status, share folders and printers, create and resize volumes - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client for automatic assignment of TCP/IP addresses - Automatic power management when the WD NetCenter hard drive is idle - Kensington(R) security slot Availability and Pricing
A 90 percent reduction in Common Internet File System (CIFS) traffic generated by Windows file services
The solution runs native on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 and Microsoft Windows Storage Server 2003, for a significant price-performance advantage over competing alternatives, and fault tolerant Common Internet File System (CIFS) clients.
High-throughput and high-capacity iSCSI Storage Arrays attached to Linux or Windows servers can provide remote Network Attached Storage (NAS) to hundreds of client workstations by hosting Common Internet File System (CIFS) or Network File System (NFS) file services over local (LAN) or wide area (WAN) networks.
Unlike BSVs, which work at the most basic level of SAN communications, FSVs work with upper-layer file system protocols: Common Internet File System for Windows and Network File System for Unix.
However, because file-sharing protocols such as Microsoft's Common Internet File System (CIFS) were not designed for use across bandwidth-constrained, high-latency WAN links, the Aker Kvaerner Australia team found sharing the large project documents internationally was virtually impossible.
NetCenter network drives feature: -- WD Caviar(R) SE 7,200 RPM hard drive inside for fast, quiet and cool operation without a fan -- 10/100Base-T Ethernet connection -- Common Internet File System (CIFS) for platform-independent file sharing -- Two hot-swappable USB host ports -- WD EasyLink utility to set up NetCenter as a local drive on any computer on the network -- NetCenter Manager software to easily view system status, share folders and printers, set up mirroring for real-time duplication of disk data, create and resize volumes -- Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client for automatic assignment of TCP/IP addresses -- Automatic power management when the NetCenter hard drive is idle -- Kensington(R) security slot
Client systems can access the shared data through any of the servers using Common Internet File System (CIFS) or Network File System (NFS), providing scalability and high-availability.

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