Common Nouns


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Related to Common Nouns: Collective nouns, proper nouns

Common Nouns

 

nouns designating the name (common name) of an entire class of objects and phenomena that possess a certain common set of features. Common nouns designate objects or phenomena according to whether they belong to such a class. Common nouns are markers of linguistic concepts and stand in opposition to proper nouns. The transition of common nouns to proper nouns is accompanied by the common noun’s loss of its linguistic concept (for example, Desna, the name of a river, derives from Old Russian desna, “right”). Common nouns can be concrete (stol, “table”), abstract (liubov’, “love”), mass or material (sakhar, “sugar”), and collective (studenchestvo, “student body”). [17–7404]

References in periodicals archive ?
A Critique of Frege on Common Nouns, HANOCH BEN-YAMI
While the 100 most common words were the usual culprits - "the", "be", "to" and "of" - they found that looking at the most common nouns provided an interesting insight to our mother tongue.
The common nouns supplement in the revised eleventh edition of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary found 90% of the top 100 were one syllable nouns.
To do otherwise is to diminish the purposeful interplay of the common nouns Hemingway used so often to refer to these women.
Teachers who are familiar with the concepts of specifier and determinative should find such questions easy to answer: model is a singular countable common noun and, therefore, typically requires a specifier.
This observation is echoed in Anderson (2007: 92): "most--perhaps all--naming traditions clearly originate in processes of naming based on common nouns or other categories, though often any such origin may be obscure".
Adding new findings to his earlier work, he discusses such topics as the nominal status of proper names, mono-referential appellative expressions, proper names between common nouns and personal pronouns, non-prototypical proper names, and socio-onomastic aspects of Flemish personal names.
I use "lexical noun phrase" to refer to the class consisting of proper names and noun phrases headed by common nouns, i.
I at least thirty-seven entries with personal names from these sources and seventeen instances of "new" common nouns.
Another shows how the Stoic distinction between proper and common nouns enabled them to propose solutions to disputes over identity.
In one study, 12 right-handed men age 21 to 35 studied two lists of common nouns presented on a computer screen as they lay under a PET scanner.