etiquette

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etiquette,

name for the codes of rules governing social or diplomatic intercourse. These codes vary from the more or less flexible laws of social usage (differing according to local customs or taboos) to the rigid conventions of court and military circles, and they extend to the legal, medical, and other professions. All cultures include forms of etiquette; often, etiquette has been used to enforce class distinctions, as well as safeguarding against conflict in social interactions.

Bibliography

See J. Martin, Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior (1983); E. Post, Emily Post's Etiquette (15th ed. 1992); Amy Vanderbilt's Complete Book of Etiquette (ed. by N. Tuckerman, 1995).

References in periodicals archive ?
Good will and common courtesy, carefully established over time to exist radically in concert with a code of gratitude
They're simple things of common courtesy that need to be maintained.
Sadly she has not had the common courtesy even to reply, much less take me up on the offer.
It seems that during the current dark evenings and mornings some dog walkers are ignoring common courtesy and decency and letting their pets empty themselves onto our streets.
The English is there because not everyone understands Welsh, and it is taken as common courtesy to provide a translation.
BY describing the MP for Blyth Valley as a pit-yakker in the most derogatory terms (May 3), Anonymous tells us more about their class prejudices and lack of common courtesy that we all need to know.
We don't need to tell you that, when it comes to the Dubai public transport system, common courtesy is dead.
Patients' lack of common courtesy wastes thousands of staff hours and uses up vital appointment time which could be given to others in need of treatment or support.
But common courtesy seemed to be in short supply, and the center soon noted that it was flooded with hostile phone calls and e-mails.
I too have sadly noticed the decline in common courtesy and manners of my countrymen when I go home, so it is possible that he was indeed an American.
These standards require little more than fair dealing, showing some common courtesy, and recognizing traditional courtroom decorum.
Little did we realise how common courtesy has been crucified by empowerment of neanderthals charged with checking bags for bombs.