Communication Trench


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Communication Trench

 

a narrow ditch with an embankment on each side, providing concealed passage between trenches as well as communication with the rear. Laid out in an irregular or winding path to protect personnel from enfilade fire, the trench may be up to 2 m deep and have a width of 70 cm or more at the bottom. Depending on the depth of the trench, troops may move through it either standing upright or crouching. Rifle pits, machine-gun emplacements, recesses, and other structures are built into the trench walls, with cul-de-sacs and wide areas dug out every 20–30 m to allow two-way traffic. Communication trenches on the forward slope of a hill have traverses.

References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Under shell fire from the Germans, Canadian troops approach the front line along a communication trench in October 1916.
A hundred yards of the communication trench was waterlogged, being four feet deep in some parts.
I heard someone say that Captain Thomas had gone down the communication trench, which was now being shelled by five-point-nines; so I went after him in case he had a message to send back to the Company - I was not aware that he had taken an orderly with him.
We went down the communication trench and had a rest where the trench branched off in different directions to the front-line companies.
The following month, he held a Turkish communication trench alone under murderous fire until a barrier had been built behind him.
In standing trenches our telephone lines generally ran down the communication trench from Battalion Headquarters to the front-line companies and then along the front-line trench.
He did not come back to the trench that night, and we began wondering whether he had been hit out with a shell when making his way down the communication trench.
Yes, he drunk them out of house and home and walked down the communication trench as sober as a judge.
Very nearly opposite the entrance of the communication trench was a solitary house which an elderly Frenchman from Armentieres had taken possession of, and he was soon selling beer and ving blong and doing a roaring trade; many a day if we had any money we would slip down the communication trench with rum jars, pretending we were going for water.
There was no communication trench and we used to travel back and forth to the village at night over a corduroy track which looked like a long black winding snake stretching over the top of the ground.

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