Communications Decency Act

(redirected from Communications Decency Act of 1996)
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Communications Decency Act

(legal)
(CDA) An amendment to the U.S. 1996 Telecommunications Bill that went into effect on 08 February 1996, outraging thousands of Internet users who turned their web pages black in protest. The law, originally proposed by Senator James Exon to protect children from obscenity on the Internet, ended up making it punishable by fines of up to $250,000 to post indecent language on the Internet anywhere that a minor could read it.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation created public domain blue ribbon icons that many web authors downloaded and displayed on their web pages.

On 12 June 1996, a three-judge panel in Philadelphia ruled the CDA unconstitutional and issued an injunction against the United States Justice Department forbidding them to enforce the "indecency" provisions of the law. Internet users celebrated by displaying an animated "Free Speech" fireworks icon to their web pages, courtesy of the Voters Telecommunications Watch. The Justice Department has appealed the decision to the U.S. Supreme Court.
References in periodicals archive ?
This Act relates to the Fair Housing Act because section 3604(c) has faced statutory challenges from section 509 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 (CDA) (34) (codified at 47 U.
Collins and Skover persuasively suggest Bruce's ghost hovered over the drama surrounding the most recent major effort by government to regulate speech, the Communications Decency Act of 1996.
The Communications Decency Act of 1996 sought to ban "indecent" or "offensive" words as well as images, on public and private systems.
Burk, the lawyer who represented Lathouwers pro bono on behalf of the ACLU, said the suit was about the First Amendment; the federal Communications Decency Act of 1996, which gives immunity to webmasters who run open forums online; and Curzon-Brown's attempt at censorship.
The Communications Decency Act of 1996 prohibited pornographic images from appearing on the Internet, but the Supreme Court decision of Reno v.
Burning the global village to roast a pig: the Communications Decency Act of 1996 is not "narrowly tailored" in Reno v.
ACLU,(1) the Supreme Court ruled on the constitutionality of two provisions of the Communications Decency Act of 1996.
The concern to be addressed by the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which constitutes Title V of the Telecommunications Act of 1996,(82) was, as the Act declares, decency.
Supreme Court overturn the Communications Decency Act of 1996.
Droney announced last week that Kufrovich is among the first prosecuted under the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which makes it a crime for an adult to use the Internet to entice a minor for sex.
2794 (1996) (considering the constitutionality of the Communications Decency Act of 1996, 47U.
He was a nationally recognized commentator on the implications of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998.

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