commuter

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commuter

An air carrier operator, operating under relevant rules, that carries passengers on at least five round trips per week on at least one route between two or more points according to its published flight schedules. The schedules must specify the times, day of the week, and locations of these flights. The aircraft that a commuter operates has 30 or fewer passenger seats and a payload capability of 7500 lb or less.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curbside Commuters offers five models of ElectroBikes that range in style, price and motor power.
An official of the Islamabad Traffic Police (ITP) said that a help-line had been established to address the grievances of the commuters.
And in the summer season and after monsoon rains, it becomes very difficult for the commuters to wait in the scorching heat without sheds", Zaka Ullah, a commuter waiting at Faisal Mor for public transport said.
With the expiration, bus and rail commuters face an additional $500 in out-of-pocket expenses annually, according to research by TransitCenter Inc.
Schibrowsky and Peltier (1993) determined that commuter students typically work more hours than non-commuters students.
2) Officially opened Wednesday, the new Canoga station, with a 611-space parking lot, could be key to getting commuters to leave their cars and ride the Orange Line busway, officials say.
EPA noted that nearly 600,000 employees currently receive commuter benefits from BWC's list of FORTUNE 500 companies, resulting in the reduction of approximately 270,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year.
Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District's nonvoting Democratic representative, is again pushing a measure that would send 2 percent of the federal taxes paid by commuters to the District's treasury.
By improving the choices available for commuters, these agencies are playing an important role in reducing the overall impact of congestion and protecting the environment, Secretary Mineta said.
Frequent fliers often depend on small commuter airlines to get from one client to the next.
The functional problem was relatively simple: commuters from both sides of the tracks had to park, then get by bridge to the central platform (no lifts allowed), where they could be (at least vestigially) protected from the weather.
This has been the case especially since deregulation in 1978, when the major airlines were allowed to leave the less profitable routes to the minors, known as commuters, or as those in the industry prefer, "regional airlines '" And, though it may surprise Will, the latest information from the research director of the congressionally created Aviation Safety Commission indicates that for those who fly with the bottom two-thirds (by size) of the commuter airlines, it's too close to say whether driving a car is riskier than flying.