Compact fluorescent lamp

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Compact fluorescent lamp

Fluorescent light bulb in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output. Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) are typically three to four times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs and last 8–10 times as long. CFLs combine the efficiency of fluorescent light with the convenience of an Edison or screw-in base, and new types have been developed that better mimic the light quality of incandescents. Not all CFLs can be dimmed, and frequent on-off cycling can shorten their life. Concerns have been raised over the mercury content of CFLs, and though they have been deemed safe, proper recycling and disposal are encouraged.
References in periodicals archive ?
LightRecycle Washington collection sites will take traditional fluorescent tubes (including straight, curved and circular tubes), the twisty compact fluorescent lights and high intensity discharge lights, which are commonly used in outdoor lighting fixtures.
As of January 1, 2013 the European Union is imposing a ban on all old bulbs in favour of energy-efficient alternatives such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) or compact fluorescent lights (CFLs).
LED bulbs face competition from compact fluorescent lights, which are almost as energy efficient and cost a lot less.
The agency analyzed the effectiveness of the state's statutory take-back programs created to keep compact fluorescent lights, vehicle switches and thermostats that contain mercury out of the waste stream.
These compact fluorescent lights are costly to produce and contain mercury - meaning they are harder to dispose of than the old bulbs.
6 billion in 2009 worldwide, Interact Holdings said, adding that LED's and compact fluorescent lights (CFL's) are gaining popularity in the United States as an energy-efficient light source for both residential and commercial applications.
Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) have replaced less-efficient lighting in many of the food storage compartments and displays, thus decreasing refrigeration needs and further saving electricity.
Q How do compact fluorescent lights work and how do they differ from standard bulbs?
When it came to the GOP proposal for a sales tax incentive for consumers to replace inefficient incandescent light bulbs with energy-saving compact fluorescent lights, Democrats in the House walked the other way, rejecting it along strict party lines, 133-20.
Qualified appliances and products include Energy Star-rated refrigerators, air conditioners, thermostats, compact fluorescent lights, and high-efficiency windows and dishwashers.
Compact fluorescent lights use 75 percent less energy than standard light bulbs, and over the life of the product, they reduce operating costs by 260 percent.
Replace your incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lights: Compact fluorescent light bulbs use only about a third as much electricity as standard incandescents.

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