research

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research

[ri′sərch]
(science and technology)
Scientific investigation aimed at discovering and applying new facts, techniques, and natural laws.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 billion in funding, and created an interagency advisory group for comparative effectiveness research (the Federal Coordinating Council for Comparative Research).
From the Committee on Comparative Effectiveness Research Prioritization of the National Academies' Institute of Medicine, this report reviews comparative effectiveness research (CER) meant to assists patients and health care providers to make more informed decisions about treatment options.
By combining special health courts and comparative effectiveness research safe harbors with other promising measures that give the medical system incentives to put patient needs first, we can dramatically change the way doctors practice medicine.
The Federal Coordinating Council for Comparative Effectiveness Research issued its report on June 29, which outlines a framework for spending comparative effectiveness research funding.
Another area of contention is whether comparative effectiveness research should focus on brand-new drugs and devices that are expensive.
Comparative effectiveness research, regardless of source, could be used by health payors to establish coverage policies, identify preferred products (including devices), determine which patient groups benefit most and least for any technology or service, and attempt to establish a value comparison among competing technologies.
In order to maintain scientific standards and attempt to generate reliable, unbiased information, the NLN strongly suggests that the proposed Health Care Comparative Effectiveness Research Institute established under S.
Comparative effectiveness research requires the development, expansion, and use of a variety of data sources and methods to conduct timely and relevant research and disseminate the results in a form that is quickly usable by clinicians, patients, policymakers, and health plans and other payers.
1 billion for comparative effectiveness research, or the head-to-head study of various treatments, devices and medications in real-world situations in order to determine which ones work best for which patients.
In a nutshell, comparative effectiveness research represents a drive toward standardization, and the concerns with it are concerns about standardization--about how standardization squares with the complexity of cases and the plurality of perspectives people bring to them.
Although comparative effectiveness research may give doctors and patients better information about what treatments work best, it's not clear that it will result in better health or less spending, according to the RAND Corp.

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