competitive exclusion


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Related to competitive exclusion: Competitive exclusion principle, Resource partitioning

competitive exclusion

[kəm′ped·əd·iv iks′klüzh·ən]
(ecology)
The result of a competition in which one species is forced out of part of the available habitat by a more efficient species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy of undefined and defined bacterial treatment in competitive exclusion of salmonella from chicks.
In this case, competitive exclusion between co-occurring species may limit the coexistence of closely related plants within a cerrado site (Webb et al.
This concept known as Competitive Exclusion (EC) based on the fact that this mature intestinal flora excludes certain enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella, from settling down in digestive tract.
In the United States, adoption of this strategy, known as competitive exclusion, has been slow as the cultures must be shown to effectively reduce pathogen levels and not contain specific antibiotic resistance genes, and its use requires FDA approval which can take many years to obtain.
In this way, predators can contribute to species evenness by keeping the dominant species from overwhelming others via competitive exclusions.
Similarly, Main and Coblentz (1996) suggested that competitive exclusion of males by females occurred for Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) feeding mostly on forbs.
As Kneen makes clear, this is entirely different from the more traditional agricultural practice of competitive exclusion.
To help the birds to fight off infection, the scheme uses a competitive exclusion product.
For salmonella in eggs (the major infection vector), control measures included vaccination, competitive exclusion and in-shell egg pasteurization.
In keeping with its design as a textbook, this book begins with a review of concepts such as ecosystem, niche, competitive exclusion, species distribution along environmental gradients, and the mosaic nature of landscapes.
Last spring, the Food and Drug Administration okayed the first competitive exclusion product.

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