classical electron radius

(redirected from Compton radius)

classical electron radius

[′klas·ə·kəl i′lek ‚trän ′rād·ē·əs]
(electromagnetism)
The quantity expressed as e 2/ mec 2, where e is the electron's charge in electrostatic units, me its mass, and c the speed of light; equal to approximately 2.82 × 10-13 centimeter.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proton and electron are Dirac particles in the sense that they both possess a Compton radius and they both obey the Dirac equation, but the positive and negative charge of the proton and electron make their characteristics radically different.
are the Compton radius and mass of the electron and Planck particles respectively.
are the mass and Compton radius of the individual Planck particles and G is Newton's gravitational constant.
It is noted in passing that the force in (24) vanishes at the electron's Compton radius [r.
defining coupling forces that vanish at the Compton radius ([r.
which are a manifestation of the fact that the proton possesses a Compton radius [r.
These two particles are referred to here as Dirac particles because they are stable, possess a Compton radius, [r.
shows that it, and those equations like (6) that follow from it, owe their existence to the PV as implied by the presence of the Planck-particle Compton radius [r.
The radius r at which (2) and (3) vanish is the particle or antiparticle Compton radius [r.
The equality of the two forces at the electron Compton radius [r.
The two forces on the right side of (7) are equal at the Compton radius ([r.