Compton scattering

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Compton scattering

(komp -tŏn) (Compton effect) An interaction between a photon of electromagnetic radiation and a charged particle, such as an electron, in which some of the photon's energy is given to the particle. The photon is therefore reradiated at a lower frequency (i.e. with a lower energy) and the particle's energy is increased. In inverse Compton emission the reverse process takes place: photons of low frequency are scattered by moving charged particles and reradiated at a higher frequency.

Compton scattering

[¦käm·tən ¦skad·ə·riŋ]
(quantum mechanics)
The elastic scattering of photons by electrons. Also known as Compton process; gamma-ray scattering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compton scatter occurs when a photon from the primary beam deflected from its primary path.
As the gammas traverse the magnetized core, many will Compton scatter with electrons reducing the number of gammas exiting the polarimeter.
Topics include measuring coating thickness, selection of a leak testing method, inspecting aluminum and magnesium castings, digital imaging and communication, X-ray Compton scatter tomography, calibrating CT density, and ultrasonic surface examination.