count

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Related to Comtesse: Comtesse Du Barry

count

1
1. the act of counting or reckoning
2. the number reached by counting; sum
3. Law a paragraph in an indictment containing a distinct and separate charge
4. Physics the total number of photons or ionized particles detected by a counter
5. Boxing Wrestling the act of telling off a number of seconds by the referee, as when a boxer has been knocked down or a wrestler pinned by his opponent
6. out for the count Boxing knocked out and unable to continue after a count of ten by the referee
7. take the count Boxing to be unable to continue after a count of ten

count

2
1. a nobleman in any of various European countries having a rank corresponding to that of a British earl
2. any of various officials in the late Roman Empire and under various Germanic kings in the early Middle Ages
3. a man who has received an honour (papal knighthood) from the Pope in recognition of good deeds, achievements, etc.

Count

 

(Russian, graf; from German Graf), in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages, a royal servitor. Beginning in the second half of the sixth century, a count in the Frankish state possessed his own district—the county—with judicial, administrative, and military authority. Gradually the post of count became hereditary. In the period of feudal disintegration, the count was a feudal sovereign; then, at the end of this period, he became a high aristocrat. The title of count is maintained to this day in most European countries with a monarchical form of government.

In Russia the title of graf was introduced in the 18th century by Peter I and was abolished in 1917.

count

[kau̇nt]
(aerospace engineering)
To proceed from one point to another in a countdown or plus count, normally by calling a number to signify the point reached.
To proceed in a countdown, for example, T minus 90 and counting.
(chemistry)
An ionizing event.
(design engineering)
The number of openings per linear inch in a wire cloth.
(mathematics)
To name a set of consecutive positive integers in order of size, usually starting with 1.
To associate consecutive positive integers, starting with 1, with the members of a finite set in order to determine the cardinal number of the set.
(nucleonics)
A single response of the counting system in a radiation counter.
The total number of events indicated by a counter.
(textiles)
The number of warp and filling threads per square inch of fabric.

count

In wire cloth, the number of openings per linear inch.
References in periodicals archive ?
This collection contains composer Franz Liszt's correspondence with Comtesse Marie d'Agoult, who was the mother of his three children.
L'oeuvre de la comtesse de Segur, bien qu'appartenant au genre "mineur" de la litterature pour la jeunesse, alimente depuis plusieurs decennies un riche debat critique qui n'a cesse de souligner sa complexite.
Neither the two wax candles nor the two silver candlesticks are stage properties in the performance of La Comtesse d'Escarbagnas.
Une phrase-cle de La Comtesse de Rudolstadt, prononcee par un des membres initiateurs de la secte des Invisibles, montre bien cependant a quel point l'engagement a tendance reformatrice de George Sand etait une realite:
La Comtesse d'Escarbagnas was also part of a court festival when it was played at St-Germain-en-Laye on 2 December 1671 and reprised there for carnival in February 1672.
Summary: Les duchesses de Cornouailles Camilla, de Cambridge Catherine (deuxieme de gauche), la comtesse de Wessex, Sophie, et le vice amiral britannique Timothy Laurence lors de la commemoration du "Remembrance Sunday" hier dimanche a Whitehall.
Liszt's affair with divorcee Marie, Comtesse d'Agoult is explored further from 8pm, with pianists Charles Rose, Antonio Pappano, Evgeny Kissin and Leslie Howard.
offscreen, Binnie Barnes' Comtesse de Bresac will reunite with Pat
Some mid to late summer flowering clematis can be treated as either Group 2 or Group 3, as desired, including Comtesse de Bouchaud, Gipsy Queen and Hagley Hybrid.
Walther's historical novel Loss of Innocence chronicles the involvement of the fictional Comtesse of Beaumont Eugenie Devereux in this and other underground plots during her country's epic journey toward the ends of liberty equality and fraternity.
In 1690, for example, when Marie-Catherine le Jumel de Barneville, comtesse d'Aulnoy inserted "L'ile de la felicite" [The Island of Happiness], the first fairy tale of the French tradition, into her novel Histoire d'Hypolite, comte de Duglas [Hypolitus, Earl of Douglas], the hero of this tale, Adolphe, is murdered by Father Time at the tale's conclusion precisely because he abandons his lady and thereby violates the medieval chivalric code.
From the panels originally conceived for the comtesse du Barry's dining room in Louveciennes (and now in New York's Frick Collection), Shonibare has re-created The Pursuit, The Lover Crowned, and The Love Letters, tastefully leaving aside Fragonard's Reverie, with its hints at masturbation, among other scenes.