Comus


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Related to Comus: Areopagitica, Lycidas, COMPUS

Comus

(kō`məs), in late Roman legend, god of mirth and revelry. A follower of Dionysus, he was represented as a drunken youth bearing a torch. In Milton's poetic masque, Comus, he is the mischievous son of Bacchus and Circe.

Comus

hard-drinking god of festive mirth; whence, comic. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 31]
See: Revelry
References in periodicals archive ?
The first parade in New Orleans was organized by the Mistick Krewe of Comus, in 1857, (https://www.
As a late Stuart masque, Comus enabled new possibilities for girl performers: Lady Alice Egerton, playing the lead role of the Lady, was a true dramatic heroine, and the masque ultimately defends the presence of girls on the stage (149).
These included the battleships Agincourt, Canada, Hercules, Malaya, Monarch, and Superb; the battlecruisers Invincible and Queen Mary; the cruisers Birmingham, Champion and Comus, and the seaplane carrier HMS Engadine, which had been converted from a passenger ferry at Palmer's shipyard on the Tyne.
William Demby was unsuccessful in having his last novel, King Comus, published while he was alive.
Neighbours in homes on Peover Street and Comus Street, which overlook the plot, told the ECHO they were pleased the uncertainty had ended - and did not mind having the police as neighbours.
Will Stockton's essay on Comus happily deploys psychoanalysis, for some years a critical red-flag in the field of early modern sexuality studies.
Two prominent examples are Jonson's The Gypsies Metamorphosed (1621) and Milton's Comus (1634).
On September 18, in the city of Tbilisi, under the Eastern Partnership initiative, it was signed a memorandum of understanding between Ukraine, the European Union and the Council of Europe in the framework of the COMUS project.
Ken added: "Other Tyne ships taking part in the battle included the Swan Hunter-built cruiser HMS Comus, which survived the epic clash, the Armstrong Whitworth-built battleship HMS Malaya (launched at the Walker Naval Yard), which although damaged survived and went on to serve during the Second World War, and the destroyer HMS Shark (Swan Hunter), which was sunk.
The English Miltonic masque tradition of Comus (1634) is Hawthorne's influence for the masque portrayal; Milton's work is referenced twice in this short story (9:57, 64).
The symbolic language of the literary tradition in which figure both Shakespeare's romances and Milton's Comus sheds some light upon the significance of the nymph.