Connemara

(redirected from Conamara)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Connemara

(kŏnəmär`ə), wild, mountainous region, Co. Galway, W Republic of Ireland, lying between the Atlantic Ocean and Loughs Corrib and Mask. Many mountains, lakes, streams, and glens help make it a well-known vacation area. Most of the villages are found along the coast; Clifden is the chief town. The peat bogs of S Connemara are major fuel sources. Particularly famous is the hardy breed of ponies peculiar to the region.

Connemara

a barren coastal region of W Republic of Ireland, in Co. Galway: consists of quartzite mountains, peat bogs, and many lakes; noted for its breed of pony originating from the hilly regions
References in periodicals archive ?
Busted-up regions like Conamara and Thera Macula cover roughly 50 percent of Europa, meaning that the moon's crust might host many enormous lakes within a few kilometers of the surface.
12) Philip O'Leary, 'Discouraging Words from the Golden West: The Conamara of Padhraic Og O Conaire', Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 8 (1988), 85-129 (p.
CONAMARA based Patrick Connolly is on the crest of a wave.
An accomplished button accordion and guitar player, he is a regular on the live music scene around Conamara and Galway.
But he loves the music and the release of Feels Like Love (a Vince Gill number), coupled with Conamara, a song written by Sean O Heanaigh from Raidio na Gaeltachta, sees Patrick set his sights firmly on a new country plateau.
It would be fun to hear her holding forth over a few jars in a nice little pub in Conamara.
The Donegal truck driving man, who now lives in Conamara, is busy working on his debut album at the Eagle's Nest Studio in Renvyle, Co Galway.
Contact Realta 97, Radio na Gaeltachta, Casla, Conamara, Co Na Gaillimhe.
Recognized almost immediately as a classic, the book, set among the dead in a Conamara graveyard, was serialized in the Irish Press between February and September of 1949, the same year it was published in Dublin by Sairseal agus O Marcaigh.
His greatest strength could paradoxically also be his greatest weakness: in hyperrealistically portraying the linguistic and societal quirks of his beloved Conamara he made his prose impenetrable to all but those readers who either hailed from the region or whose chosen field of linguistic or literary expertise it was.