concubine

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concubine

(in polygamous societies) a secondary wife, usually of lower social rank
References in periodicals archive ?
Wu Zhao's decision to have two enemies tortured and killed is another example: she tells of her determined rise to power, her humiliation at the hands of a former empress and concubine, and her need to teach these enemies a lesson, but presenting such a complex personal and political history in a few pages reduces it to a recitation of facts, and we are not engaged in either her decision or the consequences.
After all, he owned 1,400 chariots, 700 wives, 300 concubines, and gave 22,000 oxen and 120,000 sheep as peace offerings to the Lord at the dedication of his temple.
She gave the example of Haroun al-Rashid, the third caliph or head of state of the Islamic Abbasid Empire, is rumored to have had some 2,000 concubines.
If you're as happy as his first wife apparently is to be one of his concubines, that's your business.
But it is lust that conquers as Amnon sneaks into his father's harem to spy on the concubines.
While Solomon is said to have had three hundred wives and seven hundred concubines, we know the name of only one of these women, namely, Naamah, the Ammonite, the mother of his son and successor Rehoboam (2 Chr 12:13).
According to witnesses, Carey, clad in a slinky black dress, made her entrance on a pink chaise lounge carried by a bevy of buff male concubines sporting square-cut trunks and butterfly wings.
The men, and I use that term very loosely, who bring their wives or girlfriends or even concubines to these shows, should be ashamed of themselves.
In unraveling the stories Weinstein reveals much about Pistoiese and Tuscan society, about domestic violence (from jealous Lanfredino against Chiara after she had gone masquerading, or in the strange killing of a Turkish slave-servant [note 13, 184-851), about unreformed attitudes to concubines and bastards, and about Duke Cosimo de'Medici's knightly order and chivalric attitudes (which were shared by non-noble levels of society).
Mann's description of Chinese "grand family" structure, in which virtually all women were expected to become wives or concubines, playing out the role of filial daughter-in-law, created very different options from the European structures that included nuclear families and acceptable life-patterns for unmarried women.
Gassis said the little children are used as family servants while the adolescent girls are held as concubines or "instruments of pleasure" for the Muslim militias or members of the Sudanese army.