Potassium Permanganate

(redirected from Condy's crystals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

potassium permanganate

[pə′tas·ē·əm pər′man·gə‚nāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
KMnO4 Highly oxidative, water-soluble, purple crystals with sweet taste; decomposes at 240°C; and explodes in contact with oxidizable materials; used as a disinfectant and analytical reagent, in dyes, bleaches, and medicines, and as a chemical intermediate. Also known as purple salt.

Potassium Permanganate

 

KMnO4, a salt; dark violet crystals. Density, 2.703 g/cm3. Soluble in water (6.4 g per 100 g H20 at 20°C and 22.2 g at 60°C; solutions are red-violet in color), and also in methanol, acetic acid, and acetone. Potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizing agent; an explosion may occur when KMnO4 is mixed with concentrated H2SO4, as well as with certain organic substances, such as glycerol. Potassium permanganate is obtained by fusing pyrolusite, MnO2, with KOH and subsequent electrolytic oxidation of the resultant K2MnO4. (For information on the use of KMnO4, see PERMANGANATES.)