Cone of Power


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Cone of Power

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

When Witches generate power, or energy, within the ritual circle, it masses in the form of a cone whose base follows the consecrated line of the circle. This is known as the Cone of Power. The energy from this cone can be directed to cause change— in other words, to work magic.

Energy is raised by dancing and chanting and a variety of other methods (see magic). It can be done by a group (coven) or by an individual (Solitary). It is psychic energy drawn from the body and drawn up from the earth. It is of a positive nature. In Wicca, it does not involve the conjuring of any spirits or entities of any sort.

When the power has been used for working the magic, any residue remaining may be grounded, or returned to the earth. Since it is positive energy that is raised,

there is actually no need to do this, and many Wiccans feel that what remains can only benefit them. But some Witches feel it is necessary to discharge the remains and therefore "ground" the energy. They do this by slapping their hands on the ground, prostrating themselves, or using similar methods that they feel will discharge what was raised.

Cone of Power

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The “Cone of Power” is the energy generated in a consecrated ritual circle used by Wiccans (modern day Witches). When Witches generate power or energy within the ritual circle, it masses in the form of a cone whose base follows the consecrated line of the circle that has been described by the group leader. The energy from this cone can be directed, in ritual, to cause change—in other words to work magic.

Energy is raised by dancing and chanting, and a variety of other methods. It can be done by a group (coven) or by an individual (Solitary). The energy is psychic, drawn off from the body and drawn up from the earth. It is of a positive nature. In Wicca, it does not involve the conjuring of any spirits or entities of any sort.

Sources:

Buckland, Raymond: The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca and Neo-Paganism. Detroit: Visible Ink Press, 2002