Conidae

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Related to Cone snail: stonefish

Conidae

[′kän·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A family of marine gastropod mollusks in the order Neogastropoda containing the poisonous cone shells.

Conidae

 

a family of marine gastropods. The shell is from 2 to 16 cm, conical in shape, and brightly multicolored. There are approximately 700 species. They inhabit tropical and subtropical seas. Conidae are predators who attack invertebrates. The radula is equipped with poison fangs, inside which there is a canal for the secretions of special poison glands. The similarity of the poison fangs of Conidae and those of snakes is an example of convergent development (convergence). The bite of Conidae is very painful, and in humans it causes elevated temperature and inflammation of the affected site. The shells of Conidae are used as decorations.

References in periodicals archive ?
There are around 500 species of cone snail living in warm and tropical climates.
Some 30 people have died from cone snail stings since the 1930s.
Derived from the Rg1a peptide found in the venom of cone snails, these molecules were discovered in the pioneering laboratory of Baldomero Olivera, Ph.
One possible solution that Craik and his colleagues are investigating comes from an unlikely source, the cone snail.
Buried in the sand, the only visible part of the fish-hunting cone snail is its brightly colored siphon, waving alluringly in the water.
Snake venom of all kinds - as well as the more exotic and even more powerful Cone Snail venom, derived from a small creature found on the Great Barrier Reef - have been known to be used as a pain suppressant.
Other cone snail toxins are being investigated for treating intractable epilepsy (McIntsosh et al.
The two-inch cone snail, whose venom helps make SNX-111, collects poison in a gland called a venom bulb.
Mollusks with external shells, like the cone snail, were previously overlooked in the search for new antibiotics and other medications," said, Eric Schmidt, Ph.
Already, toxins from a Brazilian viper have provided the key molecule for blood pressure--lowering drugs known as ACE inhibitors, and a medication based on cone snail venom alleviates types of chronic pain that even morphine can't touch.
Washington, April 5 ( ANI ): Venom from fish eating cone snail may be used to develop powerful pain relievers, say scientists.