confessional

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confessional

1. Christianity Chiefly RC Church a small stall, usually enclosed and divided by a screen or curtain, where a priest hears confessions
2. a book of penitential prayers

confessional

confessional
A small booth furnished with a seat for a priest and with a window, screen, or aperture so that the penitent, who is outside, may whisper in the priest’s ear without being seen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fr Martin Clarke said: "The design of confessionals as they are at present prevents inappropriate contact.
But a spokesman for the Church in Ireland insisted the traditional confessional still protected children.
The glass confessionals will cost more than pounds 1,000 because the glass needs to be completely soundproof.
The new confessionals follow the Nolan Inquiry into the Catholic Church last year, which recommended that children and adults should make confession in the open.
Certainly confessionals have been - and will be in the future - safe places, with a physical barrier between penitent and priest,'' he said.
The new confessionals follow last year's recommendation by Lord Nolan, a former law lord, that it should become the norm for children to receive the ``sacrament of reconciliation'' or to make confession in the open.
OPEN TO VIEW: A double-glazed glass panel was inserted into confessional boxes at Liverpool's RC cathedral last year; WIDE OPEN: One of the confessionals being considered for Liverpool; Picture: ANDREW TEEBAY
He said most confessionals were designed with a grille between priests and penitents.
has launched the "48 Hours in Vegas" Confessional Sweepstakes (www.
Though Lavric somberly remembers being intimidated by the dark, musty confessional with its heavy red curtain, she recalls the drive to church as having elements of both a lighthearted road trip and a sobering guilt trip.
I can't ever recall going into one of those big-city churches and not seeing some lights on at some of the confessionals.
The confessional poetry of male writers, Robert Lowell, John Berryman, and Allen Ginsberg tends to explore motherhood differently, focusing not on intertexuality broadly, but on the interplay between just two voices, that of the mother and the child.