Confessions of an English Opium-Eater


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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

Thomas de Quincy tells of his opium addiction, his nightmarish experiences, and the sufferings of withdrawal. [Br. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 155]
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That said, it is somewhat difficult to follow Roe's logic in the next section of his book, "Conjunctions, 1819," in which he argues that with the onset of the disease possibly caused by overuse of mercury and exacerbated by Keats's known use of opiates during a drawn out period of incubation, we may newly read "Ode to a Nightingale" (1819), for example, as "deserving] a place alongside 'Kubla Khan' or De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater as one of the greatest re-creations of a drug-inspired dream-vision in English literature" (324).
In essays from the 1820s, '30s and '40s and in the enlarged 1856 edition of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, De Quincey re-imagines Coleridge (and his habits) as alternate versions of Marley's Ghost from A Christmas Carol, as Caliban "fretting his very heart--strings against the rivets of his chain," and as a squabbling "Transcendental Philosopher" engaged in farcical debate with boys at a druggist's shop.
De Quincey, by contrast, decidedly did, although it was not until the publication of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) at what was for a writer of his generation the advanced age of 36 that his name gained currency with the expanding reading public that kept afloat a burgeoning array of periodicals in pre-Victorian England.
His autobiographical Confessions Of An English Opium-Eater was the first commercial account of drug euphoria and addiction and brought him instant fame.
This pattern of representation becomes particularly noticeable after Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater connects opium consumption with popular magazine writing.
De Quincey writes in his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) of procrastination so profound that he cannot complete even short letters: "[M]y whole domestic economy, whatever became of Political Economy, must have gone into irretrievable confusion" (118).
7) Both Tennyson and Collins would certainly have been able to find unforgettable representations of the "stimulating influence" of opium in Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821).
De Quincey initially conceived "The English Mail-Coach" as a part of "Suspiria de Profundis," the sequel to Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.
Although many critics of Thomas De Quincey's writing have associated his highly visual descriptions with the aesthetics of the sublime, this essay explores the characteristics of the picturesque that led De Quincey to exploit that genre in many of his works, including Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, Suspiria De Profundis, The English Mail-Coach, and "On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.
From his first mature work Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) to his late essays on China and India in 1857, he is haunted by the ephemeral.
The first part, "1800-1821," includes chapters on William Wordsworth's "Residence in London" (from The Prelude), Maria Edgeworth's Harrington, and Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.
The trim fighting weight of the London Magazine version of his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, to cite the most alarming example, ballooned to more than twice its original size, and similar revisions left us with a portrait of the artist as a pedantic and verbose fuss-budget.