Congreve


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Congreve

William. 1670--1729, English dramatist, a major exponent of Restoration comedy; author of Love for Love (1695) and The Way of the World (1700)
References in periodicals archive ?
Congreve wrote one novel, Incognita, which appeared in print shortly before his first stage production, The Old Bachelor.
Despite opposition from naval and military commanders, including the Duke of Wellington, Congreve succeeded in promoting the use of his rocket, which consisted of a small warhead attached to a stick for stabilization.
Gas-light was an experimental form of lighting being pioneered by Congreve in this spectacle.
Mr Congreve began creating his magnificent labour of love at the age of 11 and his gardens are now home to the biggest collection of rhododendrons in Europe as well as other rare flower, shrub and trees.
Moreover, the remote connections with Congreve are not in themselves unambiguous.
At some point early in the game, Congreve and Eccles, with whom the poet had collaborated as early as 1701 on the masque The Judgment of Paris (published in 1702 and now available in facsimile with an introduction by Richard Platt as volume 1 in Music for London Entertainment, 1660-1800, ser.
The World as Scenery' contrives to include Congreve, Pope, Bibiena, Piranesi, Soane, Gothic novels, Venice as scenery, and Vanbrugh.
The invocation of Voltaire's report of his meeting with William Congreve is something of a ritual for those disappointed by what they understand of Congreve's later career.
English powder was considered poor during the American War of Independence, but under the Comptroller William Congreve it improved and by the Napoleonic Wars was second to none.
Unlike Congreve, however, one of Adams' most attractive subjects is the strength and decency - the comprehensibility - of friendship between women.
In the light of this belief, and of evidence derived from the capitalization and punctuation of Q1, Dearing speculates that Congreve may have been in possession of a marked-up copy of Q1 which showed that Dryden had originally written Amboyna in verse, allowed it (twice) to be printed as prose, but later repented of this 'disastrous mistake'.
In his notorious A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage (1698), Collier attacks William Wycherley, John Dryden, William Congreve, Sir John Vanbrugh, and Thomas D'Urfey.