CONIC

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conic

[′kän·ik]
(mathematics)
A curve which may be represented as the intersection of a cone with a plane; the four types of conics are circle, ellipse, parabola, and hyperbola. Also known as conic section.

CONIC

["Dynamic Configuration for Distributed Systems", J. Kramer et al, IEEE Trans Soft Eng SE-11(4):424-436 (Apr 1985)].
References in periodicals archive ?
Varying H we see that K contains a 3-dimensional family of conics and hence it is a projection of a Veronese surface.
Shrink joints with double conic intermediate elements (fig.
Move the point B and a conic with l =|DB| and r = e l is traced on the screen.
The locus of the midpoint appears to form a conic that is smaller than the original one (see Figure 14).
The differentiation between the disciplines was, nonetheless, following its course; geometry of projections had received a strong jolt at the hands of mathematicians like al-Quhi and Ibn Sahl; geometrical transformations had become an object of reflection and application for the mathematicians; a chapter on geometrical constructions with the help of the conics had taken shape and developed.
since what students had visually recognized as a particular conic did
The first is designed for use with Cabri Geometry to study the parabola as a conic section.
Keywords: -- pencils of conics, (q+1)-arcs, Galois fields, psychopathology of time
It is for this reason that I decided to write about the Arabic translation of the Conics of Apollonius, and its impact on the research, as well as on the mathematics of Descartes and Fermat.
One may also use this article as a different technique for reduction of conic sections to the standard forms.
Instructions and diagrams are provided for interpreting interferograms, and for testing curved surfaces, spheres, conics, concave mirrors, and other components of an optical system.
de Paris VII) describe theoretical and experimental studies in smectic and columnar liquid crystals for advanced students and researchers, covering such topics as structure of the smectic A phase and the transition toward the nematic phase, the continuum theory of smectics A hydrodynamics, dislocations, focal conics, rheology, ferroelectric and antiferroelectric mesophases, twist-grain boundary smectics, hexatic smectics and the smectic B plastic crystal, smectic free films, columnar phases, and growth of a columnar hexagonal phase.