Connotation


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Connotation

 

an additional, attendant meaning of a linguistic unit.

Connotation includes semantic or stylistic elements which are connected in a certain way with the basic meaning and are superimposed upon it. Connotation is used to express emotional and evaluative nuances. For example, the word metel’ “snowstorm,” which denotes a strong wind with snow, can be used connotatively in such combinations as pukh kruzhilsia metel’iu, “the down swirled around like a snowstorm,” and metel’ ognennykh iskr vzvilas’ v nebo, “a shower (literally, snowstorm) of fiery sparks soared skyward.” The idea of connotation includes an element of the word’s grammatical meaning that predicts the occurrence of another word in the text (for example, a preposition predicts a noun in a certain case). The notion of connotation in this sense was introduced into linguistics by K. Bühler.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ambition can be seen as bordering on ruthlessness, and the writer is concerned to show that the ruthless connotation of ambitious is not relevant here.
For me, accountant has almost a negative connotation.
Thomson & Thomson's Connotation Services will help companies prevent costly mistakes by identifying negative connotations in international and domestic markets before a product is launched.
I found that an excellent way of developing the concept of word connotation is through a biofeedback experience with an instrument called the Galvanic-Skin Response Meter or an Electrodermograph (EDG)/Skin Conductance Instrument.
Connotation took the Sharp Minds Betfair Nursery and Inchpast the Sharp Minds Betfair Handicap.
Besides the satirical theme, Donne's poetry drops much of alchemy's negative connotation and uses it as a rich source of metaphor, often with a clear Paracelsian basis, for a wide range of positive qualities.
So what is the world's most perfect product name, which not only is easy to pronounce in many languages but also carries a positive connotation in most?
However, Reynolds says the old name gave the connotation that everything about the areas needs improvement.
Reading that connotation into the name is absolutely stupid," he told The Dominion Post of Wellington, New Zealand.
Although the company's name may carry a negative connotation, Philip Morris's philanthropic arm has embraced the dance community.
Cancer strikes fewer people than heart disease, stroke or circulatory ailments, but it has a harsher connotation to people because they rarely die immediately and there has been a good deal of pain involved with cancer, so people are quite naturally fearful of the disease,'' said Brown, who is the director of community applications of research at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center.
Nevertheless, we do think that although Liles has been in trouble in the past for a number of different matters, this sentence was too long, having regard that there was no sexual connotation or association with these two young children.