Conodonts


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Related to Conodonts: Ostracoderms, Acanthodians

Conodonts

 

fossil remains of animals whose classification is uncertain. They have been found in deposits from the Cambrian through the Triassic. Upper Cretaceous types have also been described. Conodonts have been found in a variety of forms—toothlike, comblike, or leaflike—with dimensions ranging from fractions of 1 mm to 2–3 mm. They are composed of calcium phosphate. They evidently were arranged in the bodies of the living organisms in the form of intricate complexes known as apparatus. Conodonts are important for the stratigraphy of Paleozoic deposits.

REFERENCE

Osnovy paleontologii: Bescheliustnye, ryby. Moscow, 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the climatic changes, conodont and ammonoid faunae were initially able to recover very quickly during the Early Triassic as unusually short-lived species emerged.
There are many techniques for shale maturation measurement, but the simplest and easiest is certainly the popular Conodont Alteration Index (CAI) that can also be used with acritarch organic material.
5 m of the 6-metre sedimentary sequence of the member bears brachiopods and conodonts, the Middle Hayden fossil locality (Fig.
In the early 1980s, paleontologists discovered conodonts arranged near the front of an eel-like body, proving that they were parts of a larger creature -- perhaps the earliest vertebrate.
Jones (1953) and Wilson and Majewske (1960) recognized four subdivisions of the "cherty Lower Devonian" in the subsurface of the Midland Basin, in ascending order: (1) dark shale with conodonts and spores (0-45 feet thick); (2) dark chert and cherty limestone (100-300 feet thick); (3) fossiliferous calcarenitic limestone (450 feet thick); and (4) light-colored chert and limestone (200 feet thick).
Conodonts of the Kivioli Member, Viivikonna Formation (Upper Ordovician) in the Kohtla section, Estonia // Proc.
This evidence strongly suggests that conodonts evolved the first vertebrate dentitions.
The Lau Event was described on Gotland as a stepwise event with faunal turnovers that affected the conodonts and some other fossil groups (Jeppsson 1993; Jeppsson & Aldridge 2000).
Based on this discovery and the re-evaluation of other unusually constructed conodont feeding apparatus, the scientists developed a 3D animated model that shows how conodonts fed.