Conquerors


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Conquerors

Agricola
(40–93) enlightened governor and general; subdued all Britain. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 35]
Alaric
(c. 370–410) Visigothx chief; sacked Rome. [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 14]
Alexander the Great
(356–323 B.C.) Macedonian king and conqueror of much of Asia. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 61]
Attila
(d. 453) king of Huns. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 182]
Batu Khan
(d. 1255) Mongol conqueror of 13th century; grandson of Genghis Khan. [Asian Hist.: NCE, 248]
Caesar, Julius
(102–44 B.C.) Roman statesman and general; reduced all of Gaul and Britain to Roman control. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 416]
Canute
(995–1035) Norseman; subjugator of England. [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 42]
Charlemagne
(742–814) established the Carolingian empire. [Fr. Hist.: NCE, 507]
Charles V
(1500–1558) Holy Roman Emperor; last to sack Rome (1527). [Ital. Hist.: Plumb, 43, 406–407]
Cortés, Hernando
(1485–1547) annihilated Aztec culture, claiming Mexico for Spain. [Span. Hist.: EB, 5: 194–196]
Cyrus II
(the Great) (d. 529 B.C.) creator of Persian empire (553–529). [Class. Hist.: Grun]
Genghis Khan
(1167–1227) Mongol chieftain overran most of Asia and eastern Europe (1206–1227). [Asian Hist.: EB, 7: 1013–1016]
Genseric
(c. 390–477) Vandal king; controlled large portion of Mediterranean. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 1034]
Golden Horde
13th-century Mongol overlords of Russia. [Russ. Hist.: Grun, 170]
Hitler, Adolf
(1889–1945) led Germany to conquer or destroy most of Europe. [Ger. Hist.: Hitler]
Mohammed II
(1429–1481) Ottoman conqueror of Constantinople (1453). [Eur. Hist.: Plumb, 292–293]
Napoleon
(1769–1821) vanquished most of Europe. [Fr. Hist.: Harvey, 570]
Nebuchadnezzar
(d. 562 B.C.) subjugated Jews, initiating Babylonian captivity (597–5 B.C.). [O.T.: Daniel 1:1–2]
Pizarro, Francisco
(c. 1476–1541) with small force, destroyed Incan empire. [Span. Hist.: EB, 14: 487–488]
Tamerlane
(1336–1405) Tartar; vanquished Persia and India. [Asian Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1061]
William
the Conqueror (1027–1087) commanded Normans in conquest of Britain; victor at Hastings (1066). [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 42–46]
References in classic literature ?
That portion of the band who had followed the huge warrior took the route toward the foot of the Horican, and no other expectation was left for himself and companions, than that they were to be retained as hopeless captives by their savage conquerors.
Yea, it findeth you out too, ye conquerors of the old God
The dead jeddak's hands and head were removed to be added to the ornaments of his conqueror, and then his women cremated what remained, amid wild and terrible laughter.
There were Emperors beloved of literary men, Emperors beloved of the people, builders of long waterways and glittering palaces, and one great conqueror, the Emperor Wu Ti, of almost legendary fame.
He complicated this exordium by an exposition in which he painted the power and the deeds of the cardinal, that incomparable minister, that conqueror of past minister, that conqueror of past ministers, that example for ministers to come--deeds and power which none could thwart with impunity.
Hence, he who attacks the Turk must bear in mind that he will find him united, and he will have to rely more on his own strength than on the revolt of others; but, if once the Turk has been conquered, and routed in the field in such a way that he cannot replace his armies, there is nothing to fear but the family of this prince, and, this being exterminated, there remains no one to fear, the others having no credit with the people; and as the conqueror did not rely on them before his victory, so he ought not to fear them after it.
Captain Bassett, he, too, 'as the air of the conqueror.
Impossible to class it in that ancient family of sombre, mysterious churches, low and crushed as it were by the round arch, almost Egyptian, with the exception of the ceiling; all hieroglyphics, all sacerdotal, all symbolical, more loaded in their ornaments, with lozenges and zigzags, than with flowers, with flowers than with animals, with animals than with men; the work of the architect less than of the bishop; first transformation of art, all impressed with theocratic and military discipline, taking root in the Lower Empire, and stopping with the time of William the Conqueror.
As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
Do you think it likely the conqueror will place on me two sets of panniers?
Among the deputations of all kinds which assailed him, that of "The Lunatics" were careful not to forget what they owed to the future conqueror of the moon.
Near him stood the conqueror Jones, almost covered with blood, part of which was naturally his own, and part had been lately the property of the Reverend Mr Thwackum.