Conrad Discontinuity

Conrad discontinuity

[′kän‚rad dis‚känt·ən′ü·əd·ē]
(geophysics)
A relatively abrupt discontinuity in the velocity of elastic waves in the earth, increasing from 6.1 to 6.4-6.7 kilometers per second; occurs at various depths and marks contact of granitic and basaltic layers.

Conrad Discontinuity

 

(named after the Austrian geophysicist V. Conrad; 1876–1962), division surface between the “granitic” and “basaltic” layers of the continental part of the earth’s crust. In passing through the Conrad discontinuity the velocity of longitudinal seismic waves increases abruptly from approximately 6 to 6.5 km/sec. In a number of places there is no Conrad discontinuity, and the velocities of seismic waves increase gradually with depth. On the other hand, sometimes, several discontinuities are observed where velocities increase abruptly.

References in periodicals archive ?
This contrast, found on all continents, is called the Conrad discontinuity, and it supposedly represents the boundary between the middle and lower portions of the crust.
Since no one had ever drilled through the Conrad discontinuity to test this idea, the Soviet scientists relished the possibility of piercing the deep basalt region.