consistory

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consistory

A chamber used for a church court.
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew John Finch, "Sexual morality and canon law: The evidence of the Rochester consistory court," Journal of Medieval History 20 (1994): 270.
People named Marchaunt were prominent tenants there in 1477 and still in 1645, two of whom in 1580 were William Marchaunt senior and junior: (2) soon in 1584 a William Marchaunt would tell the Consistory Court that he knew Appowell well.
Before turning to the specific contents of these records, I would first like to consider the importance of the London Consistory Court depositions in general as a source of information for early modern theatre.
Much of the record of visitation and consistory court work speaks well for the bishops, either as prime agents or through competent officers.
Another Consistory Court judge ordered the removal or toning down of the football themed gravestone of a road-rage victim in County Durham.
I think dad will of me for think looking on The Consistory Court has to approve such moves if the remains are buried in consecrated ground.
For Giese, this takes the form of indexing a significant portion of the London Consistory Court depositions for the years 1586-1611, while Walker and Kermode tackle the problem by drawing together a collection of essays that illustrate a broad spectrum of issues relating to women's experience with the law.
The second section is a collection of documents, ranging from pamphlets to consistory court records to letters, which demonstrate women's roles as spectators, performers, and business people.
A judge of the Church of England's Consistory Court said that SAFC decorated headstone is in "flagrant disregard" to the rules of Quarrington Hill church yard.
As a result, another of her daughters, Denise White, sought permission from the Church of England's Consistory Court which has to approve matters such as exhumation requests, for permission for her father's remains to be moved to join his wife's in Nuneaton.
What would we these wonderful Thank you Mrs J Williams, I fully understand that building work on a graveyard is very emotive but as the Inspector said "matters relating to the consecrated churchyard, including the impact of buried human remains are covered by other legislation and fall within the jurisdiction of the Consistory court of the Diocese of Liverpool".
Racked with guilt at failing to follow his dying wishes, Dorothy applied to the Church of England's Consistory Court for permission to dig up the consecrated ground.