consociation

(redirected from Consociationalism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to Consociationalism: centripetalism

consociation

[kən‚sō·sē′ā·shən]
(ecology)
A climax community of plants which is dominated by a single species.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is wrong with consociationalism is that it accords so much primacy to the group rights or ethnic identities that it sacrifices the individual rights and freedom to the assertion of former.
The centripetalist approach developed as an alternative to consociationalism.
3) Surprisingly, despite the consensual nature of its political arrangement under the Ta'if Accord, he excludes Lebanon as an example of consociationalism.
Fearon and Laitin advocate that institutions based on consociationalism are capable of in-group policing, but some scheme must be implemented to impede the institutionalized dominance of any particular group.
Lebanese Governing System and the Crisis of Consociationalism
These scholars suggested an alternative form of democracy, called consociationalism or power-sharing between groups, always on the condition that the groups should not be defined and imposed by government (as in apartheid) but voluntarily formed.
He argues that confronting the realities of ethnicity has forced Nigeria to search for alternate models of democracy and national integration that can balance the interests of the three major ethnic groups within different institutions, although their reliance on consociationalism has sometimes undermined the possibilities for the development of a democratic and inclusive nation-state.
What many will take as Graber's provocative sympathy for the constitutional arguments advanced by Roger Taney, Stephen Douglas, and the Constitutional Union Party's 1860 presidential candidate John Bell, is premised on Lijphart's contention that plural polities stay together by bracketing deep moral disagreement, and by agreeing (as the American Founders did) to give significant minority interests the power to veto initiatives that effect their vital interests--all features of consociationalism.
This is indeed the more prevalent viewpoint in the wider literature: theories of federalism (Kymlicka 2001, 91-119) and consociationalism (Lijphart 1977), for example, are essentially predicated on the notion that ethnic groups often prefer their own protected space as much as they do equal participation within some shared space.
This religion will not form a new 'pillar' of consociationalism in the old style, if only because--shall we say?
As proponents of consociationalism tell us, full majoritarian democracy may not be realistic in deeply divided societies in which minorities are unwilling to submit themselves to the will of the majority, but consociationalism may equally be unviable if majorities see it as a way of perpetuating imperial rule by using relatively small majorities to thwart national independence.
The learning advantage of an interim constitution is that political formulas that are indispensable in the short term but very questionable in the long term (like consociationalism or rigid power sharing or great coalitions) can be included in interim constitutions, if carefully planned, without the fear of their transposition and insulation in the permanent document.