cobra

(redirected from Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

cobra,

name for African and Asian snakes of the family Elapidae that are equipped with inflatable neck hoods. The family also includes the African mambasmamba,
name for African snakes of the genus Dendroaspis, in the cobra family. Widely distributed throughout Africa except in the deserts, mambas have extremely toxic venom.
..... Click the link for more information.
, the Asian kraits, the New World coral snakescoral snake,
name for poisonous New World snakes of the same family as the Old World cobras. About 30 species inhabit Mexico, Central America, and N South America; two are found in the United States.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and a large number of Australian snakes. All members of the family are poisonous and have short, rigid fangs attached at the front of the mouth. Cobras are found in most of Africa and in S Asia. They are nocturnal hunters, and most feed on small mammals, birds, and frogs. Females of all but one species lay eggs. The hood, which serves as a warning device, consists of loose skin around the neck; when the snake is excited it spreads the hood by extending the underlying long, movable ribs, and inflating it with air from the lungs. The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), or hamadryad, largest of all venomous snakes, is found in S Asia; it may reach a length of 18 ft (5.5 m) and feeds chiefly on other snakes. The Indian cobra (Naja naja), a common snake of the same region, is usually 4 to 5 ft (1.2–1.6 m) long; its large hood is marked on the back by a pattern of figures resembling eyes. It preys on rats and is therefore often found in houses. The Indian cobra and the Egyptian cobra (Naja haja) are often displayed by snake charmers. The cobras appear to respond to the music played by the charmer, but, like all snakes, they are deaf and only follow the movements of the charmer. As cobras do not strike accurately during the day, charmers are seldom bitten. Most cases of snakebite from cobras occur when humans walking barefoot at night disturb the animal. Cobra venom is not as toxic as that of some other members of the family; the fatality rate among human victims is thought to be about 10%. Some African cobras can eject a spray of venom through the openings of the fangs, aiming accurately to a distance of at least 6 ft (1.8 m). Among these is the ringhals (Hemachatus hemachatus) of S Africa, which aims the spray at the eyes of the victim, causing great pain and sometimes blindness. The ringhals is the only cobra that bears live young. Cobras are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Reptilia, order Squamata, family Elapidae.

cobra

[′kō·brə]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of several species of venomous snakes in the reptilian family Elaphidae characterized by a hoodlike expansion of skin on the anterior neck that is supported by a series of ribs.

cobra

bite believed to mean certain death. [Folklore: Jobes, 352]

cobra

1. any highly venomous elapid snake of the genus Naja, such as N. naja (Indian cobra), of tropical Africa and Asia. When alarmed they spread the skin of the neck region into a hood
2. any related snake, such as the king cobra

COBRA

(spelling)
Do you mean CORBA? Or is there a COBRA?
References in periodicals archive ?
Categories: February 10, 2010, Accountability, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Budget obligations, Build America Bonds (BAB), Claims, Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA), Data collection, Economic analysis, Economic growth, Economic stabilization, Federal funds, Financial markets regulation, Financial regulation, First-Time Homebuyer Credit (FTHBC), Income taxes, Information disclosure, Information management, Internal controls, Lessons learned, Making Work Pay Credit, Payment bonds, Reporting requirements, Risk management, Tax administration, Tax credit, Taxpayers
USERRA REQUIRES EMPLOYERS TO OFFER ACTIVATED reservists and their dependents medical, hospital, dental and prescription drug coverage that conforms to the optional continuation provisions of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA).
Also included were benefit plans for retirees and former employees and dependents under the provisions of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, which requires employers to offer continued access to health care coverage for specified periods.
The taking of a leave under FMLA is not a "qualifying event" under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985--the federal medical benefits continuation statute.
The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (COBRA) protects employees facing the loss of their jobs.
The landmark 1985 Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) significantly changed the employee benefit picture by requiring mandatory continuation of employer-sponsored group health coverage that otherwise would be termminated when an employee leaves.
Steege noted: "You can continue your health insurance for 18 months under The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA), which gives workers and their families the right to continue group health benefits for limited periods of time.
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA), Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), to name only a few, have also increased administrative complexity in benefit plans for most employers.
4980B final regulations provide guidance on Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA) coverage-continuation requirements.
Description of Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) provisions.
Most workers being laid off have had health coverage through their employers and many of them are offered COBRA, short for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, which generally covers group health plans of private and government employers with 20 or more workers.
The laws to be covered include the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, better known as COBRA; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, also known as HIPAA; the Employee Retirement Income Security Act; and the Affordable Care Act.

Full browser ?