Constructed wetland

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Constructed wetland

An engineered system that has been designed and constructed to utilize the natural processes involving wetland hydrology, vegetation, soils, and their associated microbial assemblages to assist in treating wastewater. It is designed to take advantage of many of the same processes that occur in natural wetlands, but within a more controlled environment.
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Constructed wetlands and reforested terrestrial habitat are assumed to provide suitable habitat for local fauna (Kruse and Groninger 2003, Palmer et al.
The introduction of constructed wetlands in agricultural watersheds of the Mississippi basin has been recommended to reduce non-point source nutrient contributions to the Gulf of Mexico (Mitsch and others 1999, 2001; Hey 2002).
The seminar, organised by the Constructed Wetland Association, is to be held at the Holiday Inn on October 19.
In addition to these natural wetland systems, there are numerous human-influenced wetland environments, including farm ponds and reservoirs, paddy fields, gravel pits, and constructed wetlands.
The county partnered with North Carolina State University, through grants from the North Carolina Division of Coastal Management and the Water Environment Research Foundation, to study five small constructed wetlands during the preliminary research phases of the project.
Vegetated riparian buffers and constructed wetlands are BMPs being prescribed to protect water resources.
Highlights of the renovation project include a gray water system that uses constructed wetlands to treat used water from sinks and showers.
In many areas, builders are also voluntarily improving stormwater management and water quality through the use of biofiltration swales, wet ponds and constructed wetlands.
First, the cost of a constructed wetlands project on the proposed 75-acre site is estimated to be $5 million to $10 million, not $20 million, as was reported.
The stations are part of the Everglades Construction Project which calls for a combination of constructed wetlands, canals, levees and pumping stations designed to reduce nutrients in storm-water runoff from the Everglades Agricultural Area.
The project will provide an opportunity for researchers and the public to observe how properly constructed wetlands can improve the environment.