Contextualism


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Contextualism

An approach to urban planning that considers the city in its totality, the view that the experience of a city is greater than the sum of its parts. According to proponents, all architecture must fit into, respond to, and mediate its immediate surroundings.

contextualism

The “fitting-in” of a building with surrounding buildings so that it is in harmony with them, especially in terms of scale, form, mass, and color.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, as Barnes (1996) indicates, it may be possible to reconstruct more formal mathematical approaches without sacrificing contextualism, as for example in the minimalist tradition of Sraffa, but also in more recent work by Alan Scott.
161) The abstract premises of intentionalism and contextualism make such limitations inexplicable.
We offer this model as one potentially useful method to train competence in clinical functional contextualism.
But the authors criticize intersubjectivity theorists for advocating contextualism as a vital component of the development of the psyche while still using the language of structure.
Contextualism is usually a recipe for timidity, but Ban has turned the planning constraints to advantage and has created a building that is intelligent, welcoming, and dramatic.
It thus provides a chronological as well as spatial contextualism of a kind which Evans, for instance--though the catholicity of his interests and his ability to make connections across time and space would suggest he might have loved to--could never have dreamed of achieving in such a sustainedly systematic manner.
An essential preliminary is the chapter immediately before it, "Texts and Contexts," in which literary-theoretical, poststructuralist notions of textuality (Barthes, Kristeva, Foucault, Derrida) are set first against various forms of historical contextualism and then against Clifford Geertz's anthropological interpretation of culture as text.
What proposals contributors do offer, on behalf of cognitive studies (previously mentioned), semiotics (by Pier), and contextualism (by Nunning), seem viable, but far from compelling.
A metaperspective for counseling practice: A response to the challenge of contextualism.
Hence, the Hayes and Brownstein (1986) conclusion: "It is the successful operation of contextualism that pragmatically requires that control be emphasized .
The Sainsbury Wing's willingness to change in relationship to the microclimates of its divergent adjacencies, both formally and associationally--and in particular the way in which it takes themes from William Wilkin's adjacent nineteenth-century edifice and playfully hints at the ways the original played with classicism as sign, while interweaving its forms with modernist gestures--are all direct developments of that contextualism without pastiche that characterized the "Philadelphia School" in the '60s and '70s.
They are formism, mechanism, organicism, and contextualism.