contour line

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Related to Contour lines: Contour interval

contour line

a line on a map or chart joining points of equal height or depth

contour line

[′kän‚tu̇r ‚līn]
(mapping)
A map line representing a contour, that is, connecting points of equal elevation above or below a datum plane, usually mean sea level. Also known as contour; isoheight; isohypse.
(meteorology)
A line on a weather map connecting points of equal atmospheric pressure, temperature, or such.

contour line

contour lines
A line on a map or drawing representing points of equal elevation on the ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas contour lines with a V shape represent steep valleys, more rounded lines in the shape of a U indicate less dramatic elevation change.
1999) developed a raster-based interpolation method to generate digital elevation models through the dilation of contour lines stored in a raster grid.
The extracted contour line has better continuity and smoothness to pave a way for further improving cartoon visibility.
Actually, the former two problems can be merged into one matter, namely, contour lines segmentation.
Contour lines of the vertical movement velocities for the area of Poland interpolated by Wyrzykowski in 1985 are presented in Figure 2.
The accuracy of (8) is assessed as above by comparing the contour lines computed as circles with contour plots computed with the corresponding exact relationship (6).
The terrain contour interval between major contour lines on a WAC is:
1 Dishes become part of the landscape with the Dish Drainer Geo from Royal VKB, inspired by geographical contour lines, royalvkb.
Whether these flowers whose contour lines are similar with solar concentrators have condenser functions can provide sufficient light and heat to somewhere flowers need.
The new models now feature headlights with newly designed contour lines, a modified structure and light technology.
They discuss landform and the language of its design, environmental and functional constraints, contour lines, interpolation and slope formulas, the relationship between design and engineering, storm water management, soil erosion, the design and sizing of management systems, and methods for site dimensioning and layout.
These methods are: the comparison between topographical profiles extracted from DEMs for different types of landforms, the comparison between the contour lines extracted from DEMs and the contour lines from the topographical maps and the comparison between the hydrographical network derived from DEMs and the one from topographical maps.