Controlling Interest

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Controlling Interest

 

the block of stocks that ensures to its holder the de facto control of a corporation. The controlling interest is concentrated in the hands of the magnates of financial capital, who through the pyramiding system can be sole masters of a corporation even when they control only 20–30 percent or in some cases even a much smaller percentage of the shares.

References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the transaction, principals of Tampa Bay Financial have acquired a controlling stock ownership interest in ACEN.
Paxson's controlling stock, and then have operating control of the company -- if FCC rules change to allow NBC to increase its stake.
a Texas corporation ("Aviation Group"), acquired a controlling stock interest in Global Leisure Travel, Inc.
has agreed to acquire all of the issued and outstanding common stock of Tri-Star in exchange for a controlling stock interest in Food Concepts, Inc.
LeBow's reason for failing to disclose his true agenda is clear: as LeBow understands, RJR shareholders would refuse to support his consent solicitation if they knew that LeBow's true intention is to buy, through a consortium of investors, a controlling stock interest in RJR for less than its fair value," the complaint says.
Dallas), today announced that NESI will purchase a controlling stock interest in the Dallas-based company.
Your duties could vary according to the size of the practice, but would typically include: recruiting, training and supervising medical receptionists and secretaries; dealing with accounts and budgets; organising duty rosters for doctors and clerical staff; managing the reception and appointments system; controlling stocks of equipment.
In the same year, it launched the Credit Suisse Global Warming Index, offering investors the opportunity to invest in renewable energy and carbon controlling stocks, selected by the bank's equity research teams.
They do not include one of the fastest-growing segments of the economy: Rapid-growth businesses, either publicly traded or with investors, that are headed by women and whose controlling stocks are women-owned.
The council initially said the government was controlling stocks, but the department for transport claimed it was "nonsense" to suggest it was rationing supplies.