Cooper pairs

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Cooper pairs

[′kü·pər ‚perz]
(solid-state physics)
Pairs of bound electrons which occur in a superconducting medium according to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.
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org/prl/accepted/0a071Y84U5517a5dc9650932dd3e8ac53d889212c) study  that has been accepted for publication in the journal Physical Review Letters the team held that in certain solid materials cooled to extremely low temperatures, electrons form partnerships called Cooper pairs, which allows superconductivity.
However, the existence of the Cooper pair requires a trigger, which Santilli and Animalou identified as the field of the copper ions.
First, the coherent transfer of Cooper pairs is expected to be much faster than the incoherent transfer of unpaired electrons, providing much larger currents with metrological accuracy.
Levy says these electron pairs resemble tightly bound molecules; the partners in Cooper pairs spread farther apart.
These electrons form Cooper pairs with members in adjacent unit cells.
At an even more basic level, sets of electrons called Cooper pairs form superconductivity.
Researchers working in physics, from the US, Europe, Brazil, Mexico, and Japan discuss Cooper pairs, superconductivity in highly correlated systems, the behavior of the Bose Einstein condensation critical temperature, the plasmon exchange model in carbon nanotubes, thermodynamic properties of point node superconductors, theory of the thermopower in YBCO, high-temperature superconductivity in carbon nanotubes, and magnetism and quark matter.
I had wondered for years whatever became of Ogg's oggons - and only much later found out that they had become Cooper pairs as an adjunct of the BCS theory of superconductivity, these being pairs of bound electrons that occur in a superconducting medium.
In superconductors, electrons move through the material together in pairs, called Cooper pairs.
But at "high" temperatures (around 30 kelvins or above), the thinking went, heat energy would overwhelm the Cooper pairs and break them apart.
In superconducting materials, electrons form pairs, called Cooper pairs, below a critical temperature and these electron pairs behave identically.
Think of superconductivity as a flow of pairs of electrons, called Cooper pairs, says Oak Ridge (Tenn.