Cooper pairs

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Cooper pairs

[′kü·pər ‚perz]
(solid-state physics)
Pairs of bound electrons which occur in a superconducting medium according to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the existence of the Cooper pair requires a trigger, which Santilli and Animalou identified as the field of the copper ions.
First, the coherent transfer of Cooper pairs is expected to be much faster than the incoherent transfer of unpaired electrons, providing much larger currents with metrological accuracy.
Levy says these electron pairs resemble tightly bound molecules; the partners in Cooper pairs spread farther apart.
These electrons form Cooper pairs with members in adjacent unit cells.
In superconductors, electrons move through the material together in pairs, called Cooper pairs.
But at "high" temperatures (around 30 kelvins or above), the thinking went, heat energy would overwhelm the Cooper pairs and break them apart.
In superconducting materials, electrons form pairs, called Cooper pairs, below a critical temperature and these electron pairs behave identically.
Think of superconductivity as a flow of pairs of electrons, called Cooper pairs, says Oak Ridge (Tenn.
Study of such Cooper pairs could shed light on superconductivity, he suggests.
Pions, consisting of pairs of quarks, play the same sort of simplifying role as Cooper pairs in superconductivity theory.
That finding confirms a theoretical prediction that helium-3 becomes a superfluid only if its atoms are coupled in what are known as Cooper pairs.
The basic theory of superconductivity,worked out 30 years ago, states that electrons in a crystal can communicate with one another by forming what are known as Cooper pairs.