Coosa


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Coosa

(ko͞o`sə), river, 286 mi (460 km) long, rising in NW Ga. and flowing SW through E Ala., joining the Tallapoosa near Montgomery, Ala., to form the Alabama River. Locks and dams make the river navigable for barges to Rome, Ga. Jordan, Lay, and Mitchell dams on the river generate electricity.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have thoroughly enjoyed my time here at Coosa Valley and will miss the employees who have not only been exceptional to work with but who have become true friends," Tomlinson said.
Introducing flows in this section of river channel has been a central focus of our regulators and multiple stakeholders during the Coosa relicensing process, said Jim Crew.
In the early phase of the Creek Indian War, it was determined to use the Coosa River as a line of advance and as a supply line.
As part of that strategy, KC sold the Coosa Properties to Alliance Forest Products, Inc.
Recovery actions benefitting the species include the location of additional populations, population monitoring, the establishment of minimum flows below Jordan Dam to improve habitat conditions, the implementation of pulsing flows below Logan Martin Dam to improve dissolved oxygen in that reach, and the development of watershed management plans to address nonpoint source pollution (pollution that does not originate from just one location) in the lower Coosa and the Alabama River basins.
Fish collections were made at various sites in different river drainages, including the Cumberland, Tennessee, Santee, Savannah, Altamaha, Chattahoochee, and Coosa (for summary of 1876-1877 collection sites see Jordan & Brayton [1878b:810]).
By Roy Mitchell, Basketball Coach Coosa Middle School, Rome, GA
They're calling it the Coosa County Bowl instead of the Super Bowl where we're from.
It is the only pawnshop in Coosa County, which is mostly forest.
But when her mother dies suddenly, Coosa and her younger brother are thrust into an adventure that places them in the middle of two cultures, the Creek and the European.
Ethridge's reconstruction of Creek country begins with a wonderful series of maps that situate the towns and villages of the Upper Creeks on the Tallapoosa, Coosa, and upper Alabama Rivers, as well as those of the Lower Creeks along the watersheds of the lower Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers, in the mix of hardwood forests, gardens, corn fields, and other features that composed their landscape.
The area was soon repopulated by settlers from South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, including Simeon and Eleanor Rebecca Myers Windham of Coosa County, Alabama, according to the book.