Dytiscidae

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Dytiscidae

[dī′tis·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The predacious diving beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the suborder Adephaga.

Dytiscidae

 

(predacious diving beetles), a family of water beetles. The body is elongate-oval and flattened; less frequently it is convex. The beetles range in length from 1.5 to 50 mm. The oar-shaped hind legs are for swimming; the forelegs are prehensile. The elongated larvae have legs fitted for swimming, a large head, and sickle-shaped mandibles. The mandibles have ducts for sucking in prey.

Predacious diving beetles are widely distributed. Of the approximately 2,500 species, more than 270 are found in the USSR. The beetles live in fresh or, less frequently, brackish waters; they breathe air, which is stored under the elytra. At night the beetles often emerge from the water and fly. They pupate in soil near the water. The beetles and larvae are active predators and eat various aquatic invertebrates, including the larvae of mosquitoes. Large species, such as Dystiscus marginalis, even prey on tadpoles and young fish, thus sometimes adversely affecting the fishing industry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Mature larvae of Copelatus were present from 19 April through 4 May 1998 in three roadside woodland habitats where they were most frequently collected from within clumps of inundated terrestrial grasses.
The habitats used for breeding by Copelatus caelatipennis princeps were formed by winter and early spring rains and were dry by the end of May (Fig.
However, intraspecific variation was limited to coxae of mature larvae of Copelatus caelatipennis princeps and the number of sensilla was the same on the remaining segments of all legs of all larvae examined.
Seven sensilla are present on the ventral surface of the stipes of Copelatus caelatipennis princeps (Fig.
Morphlogy of the three larval instars of Copelatus haemorroidalis F.