Coping

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coping

[′kōp·iŋ]
(building construction)
A covering course on a wall.
(mechanical engineering)
Shaping stone or other nonmetallic substance with a grinding wheel.
(mining engineering)
Process of cutting and trimming the edges of stone slabs.
Process of cutting a stone slab into two pieces.

Coping

A protective covering over the top course of a wall or parapet, either flat or sloping on the upper surface to throw off water. If it extends beyond the wall, it may be cut with a drip to protect the wall surface below.

raking coping

A coping set on an inclined surface, as at a gable end.

coping

coping of terra-cotta
A protective cap, top, or cover of wall, parapet, pilaster, or chimney; often of stone, terra-cotta, concrete, metal, or wood. May be flat, but commonly sloping, double-beveled, or curved to shed water so as to protect masonry below from penetration of water from above. Most effective if extended beyond wall face and cut with a drip. Also see featheredged coping.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association between spiritual health and coping skills and other socio-demographic factors was assessed using Chi square test for qualitative variables.
Similarly, although Marlatt's classification of relapse situations h as provided a framework for designing CBST approaches to improve appropriate coping skills (Marlatt and Gordon 1985), little data suggest that those coping skills are more effective in some high-risk relapse situations than in others.
Group coping skills instruction and supportive group therapy for cancer patients: A comparison of strategies.
First, studies indicate that alcoholics' coping skills are inferior to the coping skills of nonalcoholics, particularly in situations that commonly pose a risk of relapse, such as a family conflict or parties at which alcohol is served (Monti et al.
One prominent psychological intervention for addiction treatment and relapse prevention used in recent years is the cognitive-behavioral therapy model, which focuses on treating psychological disorders and aiding patients to acquire coping skills necessary to manage risky situations.
Seniors with stronger proactive coping skills are more future-oriented and are more able to imagine the value technology has for them and thus are more likely to be technology optimists.
Within the conceptual model, social support and psychological coping skills were considered protective factors for athletes who were high in life stress.
If concurrent treatment is chosen, two types of therapies have been identified: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), especially coping skills training, and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT).
This document provides hands-on, practical advice for practitioners to support children's self-perception and coping skills by establishing and maintaining a positive verbal environment.
Their mission is to empower families who are facing the realities of war, trauma or mental illness by providing critical information, coping skills, encouragement, comfort and, of course, hope.
Participants will learn ideas and techniques about relaxation, healthy eating, exercise and dealing with issues like anger, fear, isolation, depression and coping skills.
Steen's paper, entitled Promoting Positive Coping Skills in the New Nursing Workforce, covers an integrated literature review of substance abuse among nurses, concentrating on the importance of awareness and knowledge among nurses and nurse leaders, and the support that will be necessary to ensure the success of the new nursing workforce.